A randomized controlled trial of topical benzoyl peroxide 2.5% gel with a low glycemic load diet versus topical benzoyl peroxide 2.5% gel with a normal diet in acne (grades 1-3)

G. Pavithra, Gatha Upadya, M. Rukmini

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: The improvement in insulin resistance and acne lesions on low glycemic load diets in various studies suggests that diet plays a significant role in acne pathogenesis. Aims: To compare the efficacy of a low glycemic load diet plus topical benzoyl peroxide 2.5% gel with that of only topical benzoyl peroxide 2.5% gel in grades 1, 2 and 3 of acne vulgaris. Methods: In a randomized controlled trial, 84 patients with grades 1, 2 and 3 acne vulgaris were divided into two groups, to receive a low glycemic load diet and no dietary intervention respectively. Acne lesions (face) were scored and graded at baseline and 4, 8 and 12 weeks. Homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance and body mass index were measured during the first and last visits. Statistical analysis was done with Statistical Package for the Social Sciences, version 17.0. Results: Both groups showed significant reduction in acne counts at 12 weeks (P = 0.931) with no statistically significant difference between the groups. The differences in body mass index and homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance between the groups were statistically significant (P = 0.0001). Group 1 showed reductions in body mass index and homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance values at the end of the study, whereas group 2 did not. Limitations: Application of mild topical cleanser in both the groups might have contributed to the improvement in epidermal barrier function, and topical application of 2.5% of benzoyl peroxide gel in both groups contributed to the improvement in acne counts. Conclusions: A low glycemic load diet did not result in any significant improvement in acne counts.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)486-490
Number of pages5
JournalIndian Journal of Dermatology, Venereology and Leprology
Volume85
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 01-09-2019

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Benzoyl Peroxide
Acne Vulgaris
Randomized Controlled Trials
Gels
Diet
Insulin Resistance
Body Mass Index
Homeostasis
Glycemic Load
Social Sciences

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Dermatology
  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

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title = "A randomized controlled trial of topical benzoyl peroxide 2.5{\%} gel with a low glycemic load diet versus topical benzoyl peroxide 2.5{\%} gel with a normal diet in acne (grades 1-3)",
abstract = "Background: The improvement in insulin resistance and acne lesions on low glycemic load diets in various studies suggests that diet plays a significant role in acne pathogenesis. Aims: To compare the efficacy of a low glycemic load diet plus topical benzoyl peroxide 2.5{\%} gel with that of only topical benzoyl peroxide 2.5{\%} gel in grades 1, 2 and 3 of acne vulgaris. Methods: In a randomized controlled trial, 84 patients with grades 1, 2 and 3 acne vulgaris were divided into two groups, to receive a low glycemic load diet and no dietary intervention respectively. Acne lesions (face) were scored and graded at baseline and 4, 8 and 12 weeks. Homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance and body mass index were measured during the first and last visits. Statistical analysis was done with Statistical Package for the Social Sciences, version 17.0. Results: Both groups showed significant reduction in acne counts at 12 weeks (P = 0.931) with no statistically significant difference between the groups. The differences in body mass index and homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance between the groups were statistically significant (P = 0.0001). Group 1 showed reductions in body mass index and homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance values at the end of the study, whereas group 2 did not. Limitations: Application of mild topical cleanser in both the groups might have contributed to the improvement in epidermal barrier function, and topical application of 2.5{\%} of benzoyl peroxide gel in both groups contributed to the improvement in acne counts. Conclusions: A low glycemic load diet did not result in any significant improvement in acne counts.",
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AU - Upadya, Gatha

AU - Rukmini, M.

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N2 - Background: The improvement in insulin resistance and acne lesions on low glycemic load diets in various studies suggests that diet plays a significant role in acne pathogenesis. Aims: To compare the efficacy of a low glycemic load diet plus topical benzoyl peroxide 2.5% gel with that of only topical benzoyl peroxide 2.5% gel in grades 1, 2 and 3 of acne vulgaris. Methods: In a randomized controlled trial, 84 patients with grades 1, 2 and 3 acne vulgaris were divided into two groups, to receive a low glycemic load diet and no dietary intervention respectively. Acne lesions (face) were scored and graded at baseline and 4, 8 and 12 weeks. Homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance and body mass index were measured during the first and last visits. Statistical analysis was done with Statistical Package for the Social Sciences, version 17.0. Results: Both groups showed significant reduction in acne counts at 12 weeks (P = 0.931) with no statistically significant difference between the groups. The differences in body mass index and homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance between the groups were statistically significant (P = 0.0001). Group 1 showed reductions in body mass index and homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance values at the end of the study, whereas group 2 did not. Limitations: Application of mild topical cleanser in both the groups might have contributed to the improvement in epidermal barrier function, and topical application of 2.5% of benzoyl peroxide gel in both groups contributed to the improvement in acne counts. Conclusions: A low glycemic load diet did not result in any significant improvement in acne counts.

AB - Background: The improvement in insulin resistance and acne lesions on low glycemic load diets in various studies suggests that diet plays a significant role in acne pathogenesis. Aims: To compare the efficacy of a low glycemic load diet plus topical benzoyl peroxide 2.5% gel with that of only topical benzoyl peroxide 2.5% gel in grades 1, 2 and 3 of acne vulgaris. Methods: In a randomized controlled trial, 84 patients with grades 1, 2 and 3 acne vulgaris were divided into two groups, to receive a low glycemic load diet and no dietary intervention respectively. Acne lesions (face) were scored and graded at baseline and 4, 8 and 12 weeks. Homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance and body mass index were measured during the first and last visits. Statistical analysis was done with Statistical Package for the Social Sciences, version 17.0. Results: Both groups showed significant reduction in acne counts at 12 weeks (P = 0.931) with no statistically significant difference between the groups. The differences in body mass index and homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance between the groups were statistically significant (P = 0.0001). Group 1 showed reductions in body mass index and homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance values at the end of the study, whereas group 2 did not. Limitations: Application of mild topical cleanser in both the groups might have contributed to the improvement in epidermal barrier function, and topical application of 2.5% of benzoyl peroxide gel in both groups contributed to the improvement in acne counts. Conclusions: A low glycemic load diet did not result in any significant improvement in acne counts.

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