Acceptability of male circumcision among mothers with male children in Mysore, India

Purnima Madhivanan, Karl Krupp, Varalakshmi Chandrasekaran, Samuel C. Karat, Arthur L. Reingold, Jeffrey D. Klausner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

29 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: There is currently little information on the acceptability of male circumcision in India. This study investigated the acceptability of male circumcision among Indian mothers with male children. DESIGN: A cross-sectional survey was conducted among a convenience sample of 795 women attending a reproductive health clinic in Mysore, India, between January and April 2007. RESULTS: Of the 1012 invited eligible participants, 795 women agreed to participate (response rate = 78.5%). The majority of women were Hindus (78%), 18% were Muslims, and 4% were Christians. About 26% of respondents had no schooling, 29% had 7 years of schooling, 42% had 8-12 years, and 3% had more than 12 years. After women were informed about the risks and benefits of male circumcision, a majority of women with uncircumcised children (n = 564, 81%) said they would definitely circumcise their children if the procedure were offered in a safe hospital setting, free of charge, and a smaller number (n = 50, 7%) said they would probably consider the procedure. Only seven women (1%) said that they would definitely/probably not consider male circumcision, and 63 (9%) were unsure. CONCLUSION: Since male circumcision has been found to decrease risk of HIV infection among men, it is important to determine its acceptability as a potential HIV prevention strategy in India. This study found male circumcision to be highly acceptable among a broad range of mothers with male children in Mysore, India. Further studies of acceptability among fathers and other populations are warranted.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)983-988
Number of pages6
JournalAIDS
Volume22
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 01-05-2008

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Male Circumcision
India
Mothers
Islam
Reproductive Health
Fathers
HIV Infections
Cross-Sectional Studies
HIV
Population

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Immunology
  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

Madhivanan, P., Krupp, K., Chandrasekaran, V., Karat, S. C., Reingold, A. L., & Klausner, J. D. (2008). Acceptability of male circumcision among mothers with male children in Mysore, India. AIDS, 22(8), 983-988. https://doi.org/10.1097/QAD.0b013e3282ffde52
Madhivanan, Purnima ; Krupp, Karl ; Chandrasekaran, Varalakshmi ; Karat, Samuel C. ; Reingold, Arthur L. ; Klausner, Jeffrey D. / Acceptability of male circumcision among mothers with male children in Mysore, India. In: AIDS. 2008 ; Vol. 22, No. 8. pp. 983-988.
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abstract = "OBJECTIVE: There is currently little information on the acceptability of male circumcision in India. This study investigated the acceptability of male circumcision among Indian mothers with male children. DESIGN: A cross-sectional survey was conducted among a convenience sample of 795 women attending a reproductive health clinic in Mysore, India, between January and April 2007. RESULTS: Of the 1012 invited eligible participants, 795 women agreed to participate (response rate = 78.5{\%}). The majority of women were Hindus (78{\%}), 18{\%} were Muslims, and 4{\%} were Christians. About 26{\%} of respondents had no schooling, 29{\%} had 7 years of schooling, 42{\%} had 8-12 years, and 3{\%} had more than 12 years. After women were informed about the risks and benefits of male circumcision, a majority of women with uncircumcised children (n = 564, 81{\%}) said they would definitely circumcise their children if the procedure were offered in a safe hospital setting, free of charge, and a smaller number (n = 50, 7{\%}) said they would probably consider the procedure. Only seven women (1{\%}) said that they would definitely/probably not consider male circumcision, and 63 (9{\%}) were unsure. CONCLUSION: Since male circumcision has been found to decrease risk of HIV infection among men, it is important to determine its acceptability as a potential HIV prevention strategy in India. This study found male circumcision to be highly acceptable among a broad range of mothers with male children in Mysore, India. Further studies of acceptability among fathers and other populations are warranted.",
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Madhivanan, P, Krupp, K, Chandrasekaran, V, Karat, SC, Reingold, AL & Klausner, JD 2008, 'Acceptability of male circumcision among mothers with male children in Mysore, India', AIDS, vol. 22, no. 8, pp. 983-988. https://doi.org/10.1097/QAD.0b013e3282ffde52

Acceptability of male circumcision among mothers with male children in Mysore, India. / Madhivanan, Purnima; Krupp, Karl; Chandrasekaran, Varalakshmi; Karat, Samuel C.; Reingold, Arthur L.; Klausner, Jeffrey D.

In: AIDS, Vol. 22, No. 8, 01.05.2008, p. 983-988.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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N2 - OBJECTIVE: There is currently little information on the acceptability of male circumcision in India. This study investigated the acceptability of male circumcision among Indian mothers with male children. DESIGN: A cross-sectional survey was conducted among a convenience sample of 795 women attending a reproductive health clinic in Mysore, India, between January and April 2007. RESULTS: Of the 1012 invited eligible participants, 795 women agreed to participate (response rate = 78.5%). The majority of women were Hindus (78%), 18% were Muslims, and 4% were Christians. About 26% of respondents had no schooling, 29% had 7 years of schooling, 42% had 8-12 years, and 3% had more than 12 years. After women were informed about the risks and benefits of male circumcision, a majority of women with uncircumcised children (n = 564, 81%) said they would definitely circumcise their children if the procedure were offered in a safe hospital setting, free of charge, and a smaller number (n = 50, 7%) said they would probably consider the procedure. Only seven women (1%) said that they would definitely/probably not consider male circumcision, and 63 (9%) were unsure. CONCLUSION: Since male circumcision has been found to decrease risk of HIV infection among men, it is important to determine its acceptability as a potential HIV prevention strategy in India. This study found male circumcision to be highly acceptable among a broad range of mothers with male children in Mysore, India. Further studies of acceptability among fathers and other populations are warranted.

AB - OBJECTIVE: There is currently little information on the acceptability of male circumcision in India. This study investigated the acceptability of male circumcision among Indian mothers with male children. DESIGN: A cross-sectional survey was conducted among a convenience sample of 795 women attending a reproductive health clinic in Mysore, India, between January and April 2007. RESULTS: Of the 1012 invited eligible participants, 795 women agreed to participate (response rate = 78.5%). The majority of women were Hindus (78%), 18% were Muslims, and 4% were Christians. About 26% of respondents had no schooling, 29% had 7 years of schooling, 42% had 8-12 years, and 3% had more than 12 years. After women were informed about the risks and benefits of male circumcision, a majority of women with uncircumcised children (n = 564, 81%) said they would definitely circumcise their children if the procedure were offered in a safe hospital setting, free of charge, and a smaller number (n = 50, 7%) said they would probably consider the procedure. Only seven women (1%) said that they would definitely/probably not consider male circumcision, and 63 (9%) were unsure. CONCLUSION: Since male circumcision has been found to decrease risk of HIV infection among men, it is important to determine its acceptability as a potential HIV prevention strategy in India. This study found male circumcision to be highly acceptable among a broad range of mothers with male children in Mysore, India. Further studies of acceptability among fathers and other populations are warranted.

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