Adverse effects of fluoroquinolones: A retrospective cohort study in a South Indian tertiary healthcare facility

Benitta Mathews, Ashley Ann Thalody, Sonal Sekhar Miraj, Vijayanarayana Kunhikatta, Mahadev Rao, Kavitha Saravu

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) safety review revealed that the use of fluoroquinolones (FQs) is linked with disabling and potentially permanent serious adverse effects. These adverse effects compromise the tendons, muscles, joints, nerves, and central nervous system of the human body. The purpose of the study was to investigate the incidence and risk factors for adverse drug reactions (ADRs) caused by FQs in comparison with other antibiotics used. A retrospective cohort study was conducted over seven months in Kasturba Medical College Hospital, Manipal, India. Patients who were prescribed with FQs were selected as the study cohort (SC; n = 482), and those without FQs were the reference cohort (RC; n = 318). The results showed that 8.5% (41) of patients developed ADRs in the SC, whereas 4.1% (13) of patients developed ADRs in the RC. With oral and parenteral routes of administration, almost a similar number of ADRs were observed. Levofloxacin caused the highest number of ADRs reported, especially with the 750-mg dose. Based on a multiple logistic regression model, FQ use (odds ratio (OR): 2.27; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.18–4.39; p = 0.015) and concomitant steroid use (OR: 3.19; 95% CI: 1.31–7.79; p = 0.011) were identified as independent risk factors for the development of ADRs among antibiotics users, whereas age was found to be protective (OR: 0.98; 95% CI: 0.97–1.00; p = 0.047). The study found a higher incidence of ADRs related to FQs compared to other antibiotics. The study concludes a harmful association between FQ use and the development of ADRs. Moreover, FQs are not safe compared to other antibiotics. Hence, the use of FQs should be limited to the conditions where no other alternatives are available.

Original languageEnglish
Article number104
JournalAntibiotics
Volume8
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 01-09-2019

Fingerprint

Fluoroquinolones
Tertiary Healthcare
Drug-Related Side Effects and Adverse Reactions
Cohort Studies
Retrospective Studies
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Anti-Bacterial Agents
Odds Ratio
Confidence Intervals
Logistic Models
Levofloxacin
Tendons
Incidence
Neurology
United States Food and Drug Administration
Human Body
Muscle
Logistics
India
Central Nervous System

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Microbiology
  • Biochemistry
  • Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutics(all)
  • Microbiology (medical)
  • Infectious Diseases
  • Pharmacology (medical)

Cite this

Mathews, Benitta ; Thalody, Ashley Ann ; Miraj, Sonal Sekhar ; Kunhikatta, Vijayanarayana ; Rao, Mahadev ; Saravu, Kavitha. / Adverse effects of fluoroquinolones : A retrospective cohort study in a South Indian tertiary healthcare facility. In: Antibiotics. 2019 ; Vol. 8, No. 3.
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Adverse effects of fluoroquinolones : A retrospective cohort study in a South Indian tertiary healthcare facility. / Mathews, Benitta; Thalody, Ashley Ann; Miraj, Sonal Sekhar; Kunhikatta, Vijayanarayana; Rao, Mahadev; Saravu, Kavitha.

In: Antibiotics, Vol. 8, No. 3, 104, 01.09.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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