All India difficult airway association 2016 guidelines for the management of unanticipated difficult tracheal intubation in adults

Sheila Nainan Myatra, Amit Shah, Pankaj Kundra, Apeksh Patwa, Venkateswaran Ramkumar, Jigeeshu Vasishtha Divatia, Ubaradka S. Raveendra, Sumalatha Radhakrishna Shetty, Syed Moied Ahmed, Jeson Rajan, Dilip K. Pawar, Singaravelu Ramesh, Sabyasachi Das, Rakesh Garg

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

43 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The All India Difficult Airway Association (AIDAA) guidelines for management of the unanticipated difficult airway in adults provide a structured, stepwise approach to manage unanticipated difficulty during tracheal intubation in adults. They have been developed based on the available evidence; wherever robust evidence was lacking, or to suit the needs and situation in India, recommendations were arrived at by consensus opinion of airway experts, incorporating the responses to a questionnaire sent to members of the AIDAA and the Indian Society of Anaesthesiologists. We recommend optimum pre‑oxygenation and nasal insufflation of 15 L/min oxygen during apnoea in all patients, and calling for help if the initial attempt at intubation is unsuccessful. Transnasal humidified rapid insufflations of oxygen at 70 L/min (transnasal humidified rapid insufflation ventilatory exchange) should be used when available. We recommend no more than three attempts at tracheal intubation and two attempts at supraglottic airway device (SAD) insertion if intubation fails, provided oxygen saturation remains ≥ 95%. Intubation should be confirmed by capnography. Blind tracheal intubation through the SAD is not recommended. If SAD insertion fails, one final attempt at mask ventilation should be tried after ensuring neuromuscular blockade using the optimal technique for mask ventilation. Failure to intubate the trachea as well as an inability to ventilate the lungs by face mask and SAD constitutes ‘complete ventilation failure’, and emergency cricothyroidotomy should be performed. Patient counselling, documentation and standard reporting of the airway difficulty using a ‘difficult airway alert form’ must be done. In addition, the AIDAA provides suggestions for the contents of a difficult airway cart.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)885-898
Number of pages14
JournalIndian Journal of Anaesthesia
Volume60
Issue number12
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 01-12-2016
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Intubation
India
Guidelines
Insufflation
Masks
Equipment and Supplies
Oxygen
Capnography
Neuromuscular Blockade
Expert Testimony
Apnea
Trachea
Nose
Documentation
Ventilation
Counseling
Consensus
Emergencies
Lung

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine

Cite this

Myatra, Sheila Nainan ; Shah, Amit ; Kundra, Pankaj ; Patwa, Apeksh ; Ramkumar, Venkateswaran ; Divatia, Jigeeshu Vasishtha ; Raveendra, Ubaradka S. ; Shetty, Sumalatha Radhakrishna ; Ahmed, Syed Moied ; Rajan, Jeson ; Pawar, Dilip K. ; Ramesh, Singaravelu ; Das, Sabyasachi ; Garg, Rakesh. / All India difficult airway association 2016 guidelines for the management of unanticipated difficult tracheal intubation in adults. In: Indian Journal of Anaesthesia. 2016 ; Vol. 60, No. 12. pp. 885-898.
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Myatra, SN, Shah, A, Kundra, P, Patwa, A, Ramkumar, V, Divatia, JV, Raveendra, US, Shetty, SR, Ahmed, SM, Rajan, J, Pawar, DK, Ramesh, S, Das, S & Garg, R 2016, 'All India difficult airway association 2016 guidelines for the management of unanticipated difficult tracheal intubation in adults', Indian Journal of Anaesthesia, vol. 60, no. 12, pp. 885-898. https://doi.org/10.4103/0019-5049.195481

All India difficult airway association 2016 guidelines for the management of unanticipated difficult tracheal intubation in adults. / Myatra, Sheila Nainan; Shah, Amit; Kundra, Pankaj; Patwa, Apeksh; Ramkumar, Venkateswaran; Divatia, Jigeeshu Vasishtha; Raveendra, Ubaradka S.; Shetty, Sumalatha Radhakrishna; Ahmed, Syed Moied; Rajan, Jeson; Pawar, Dilip K.; Ramesh, Singaravelu; Das, Sabyasachi; Garg, Rakesh.

In: Indian Journal of Anaesthesia, Vol. 60, No. 12, 01.12.2016, p. 885-898.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Garg, Rakesh

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