An epidemiological study to assess the environmental and socio-cultural determinants of malaria in coastal Karnataka

Abhishek Guhey, Varalakshmi Chandra Sekaran, Ashma D. Monteiro, Nisha Motwani

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: India has grappled with the problem of malaria since many decades. Moreover, Udupi district contributes 13% of malaria cases to Karnataka making it a significant public health concern. Objectives: To explore the socio-cultural and environmental factors that affect malaria incidence in Udupi. Methods: Areas with high annual incidence of malaria in Udupi city were selected for the study. A validated structured questionnaire was used for data collection. Study findings were expressed in frequencies and percentages. Results: Out of 315 households, 79.7% belonged to urban areas with 30.1% being graduates and above. In 14% of households, there was a malaria case in the past one year. The respondents were assessed for belief surrounding malaria and most of the respondents (80.3%) agreed that malaria is a severe disease that needs treatment. On assessing for treatment seeking behaviour, the majority of the respondents preferred private clinics (58.7%). On probing for prevention practices, most respondents (89.8%) preferred indoor residuals spraying. Only 31% of the respondents were found to be using bed nets at night. Almost 8.9% of the houses had completely uncovered windows thus facilitating the entry of mosquito indoors. Majority of the respondents were found to have open wells in close proximity to their homes(71.4%). Conclusion: It was found that despite having adequate knowledge regarding, malaria people do not adhere to the prevention strategies. The socio-cultural, housing and environmental factors were found to favour mosquito breeding and biting with potentiality of malaria transmission.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2-7
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Communicable Diseases
Volume51
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 01-01-2019

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Malaria
Epidemiologic Studies
Culicidae
Incidence
Surveys and Questionnaires
Breeding
India
Public Health
Therapeutics

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

Guhey, Abhishek ; Sekaran, Varalakshmi Chandra ; Monteiro, Ashma D. ; Motwani, Nisha. / An epidemiological study to assess the environmental and socio-cultural determinants of malaria in coastal Karnataka. In: Journal of Communicable Diseases. 2019 ; Vol. 51, No. 2. pp. 2-7.
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An epidemiological study to assess the environmental and socio-cultural determinants of malaria in coastal Karnataka. / Guhey, Abhishek; Sekaran, Varalakshmi Chandra; Monteiro, Ashma D.; Motwani, Nisha.

In: Journal of Communicable Diseases, Vol. 51, No. 2, 01.01.2019, p. 2-7.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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