Anaesthesia machine

Checklist, hazards, scavenging

Umesh Goneppanavar, Manjunath Prabhu

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

From a simple pneumatic device of the early 20thcentury, the anaesthesia machine has evolved to incorporate various mechanical, electrical and electronic components to be more appropriately called anaesthesia workstation. Modern machines have overcome many drawbacks associated with the older machines. However, addition of several mechanical, electronic and electric components has contributed to recurrence of some of the older problems such as leak or obstruction attributable to newer gadgets and development of newer problems. No single checklist can satisfactorily test the integrity and safety of all existing anaesthesia machines due to their complex nature as well as variations in design among manufacturers. Human factors have contributed to greater complications than machine faults. Therefore, better understanding of the basics of anaesthesia machine and checking each component of the machine for proper functioning prior to use is essential to minimise these hazards. Clear documentation of regular and appropriate servicing of the anaesthesia machine, its components and their satisfactory functioning following servicing and repair is also equally important. Trace anaesthetic gases polluting the theatre atmosphere can have several adverse effects on the health of theatre personnel. Therefore, safe disposal of these gases away from the workplace with efficiently functioning scavenging system is necessary. Other ways of minimising atmospheric pollution such as gas delivery equipment with negligible leaks, low flow anaesthesia, minimal leak around the airway equipment(facemask, tracheal tube, laryngeal mask airway, etc.) more than 15 air changes/hour and total intravenous anaesthesia should also be considered.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)533-540
Number of pages8
JournalIndian Journal of Anaesthesia
Volume57
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 01-09-2013
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Checklist
Anesthesia
Equipment and Supplies
Gases
Inhalation Anesthetics
Intravenous Anesthesia
Laryngeal Masks
Atmosphere
Workplace
Documentation
Health Personnel
Air
Safety
Recurrence

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine

Cite this

Goneppanavar, Umesh ; Prabhu, Manjunath. / Anaesthesia machine : Checklist, hazards, scavenging. In: Indian Journal of Anaesthesia. 2013 ; Vol. 57, No. 5. pp. 533-540.
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Anaesthesia machine : Checklist, hazards, scavenging. / Goneppanavar, Umesh; Prabhu, Manjunath.

In: Indian Journal of Anaesthesia, Vol. 57, No. 5, 01.09.2013, p. 533-540.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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