Anesthetic agent vapor analyzers and propellants of pressurized meter-dose inhalers

Kavaraganahalli Mukundarao Deepak, Kiran Kini

Research output: Contribution to journalShort survey

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Anesthetic agent analyzers fail when drug from a HFA propelled pMDI is administered. Most anesthetic vapor analyzers use infrared absorption at 3.3 micron. At this wavelength, substance like methane has been reported to interfere with the accuracy of measurement of anesthetic vapor. The anesthetic gas monitor 1304 (Brüel and Kjaer) which functions at 10.3-13 micron wavelength was not affected by methane. Is it possible, HFA with its structural similarity to inhaled anesthetic agents may be responsible for faulty reading of anesthetic vapor concentration in two of our monitors? Further evidence is needed to support this finding. Anesthesiologists need to be ever vigilant and recognize the need for smarter designs of anesthetic agent analyzers with changing array of drugs administered during anesthetic management.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)131-132
Number of pages2
JournalJournal of Clinical Monitoring and Computing
Volume24
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 01-04-2010
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Nebulizers and Vaporizers
Anesthetics
Methane
Inhalation Anesthetics
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Reading

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Health Informatics
  • Critical Care and Intensive Care Medicine
  • Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine

Cite this

Deepak, Kavaraganahalli Mukundarao ; Kini, Kiran. / Anesthetic agent vapor analyzers and propellants of pressurized meter-dose inhalers. In: Journal of Clinical Monitoring and Computing. 2010 ; Vol. 24, No. 2. pp. 131-132.
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Anesthetic agent vapor analyzers and propellants of pressurized meter-dose inhalers. / Deepak, Kavaraganahalli Mukundarao; Kini, Kiran.

In: Journal of Clinical Monitoring and Computing, Vol. 24, No. 2, 01.04.2010, p. 131-132.

Research output: Contribution to journalShort survey

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