Anomalous origin of the lumbrical muscles: A study on South Indian cadavers

B. K. Potu, V. R. Gorantla, Muddanna S. Rao, Kumar M.R. Bhat, V. R. Vollala, T. Pulakunta, S. R. Nayak

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Abstract

Although variations in the attachments of the lumbrical muscles have been commonly reported, these have been seen mainly in the Caucasian population. The present study has been undertaken in South Indian population. The upper extremities of 24 South Indian (20 male and four female) cadavers were examined. Three instances of variant origins of the lumbrical muscles (two instances of the second and one of the first lumbrical) were seen. The muscles were unusually long extending to the level of the proximal border of the flexor retinaculum and in two of the cases it was taking origin from the flexor digitorum profundus tendon and its accessory belly. In one case it was taking origin from the flexor digitorum profundus and superficialis tendons. An anomalous origin of the lumbrical from muscles in the forearm has the potential to cause compression of the median nerve in the carpal tunnel.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)87-89
Number of pages3
JournalMorphologie
Volume92
Issue number297
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 01-08-2008
Externally publishedYes

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Anatomy

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    Potu, B. K., Gorantla, V. R., Rao, M. S., Bhat, K. M. R., Vollala, V. R., Pulakunta, T., & Nayak, S. R. (2008). Anomalous origin of the lumbrical muscles: A study on South Indian cadavers. Morphologie, 92(297), 87-89. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.morpho.2008.04.006