Anterior abdominal wall - An unusual site for ectopic testis

P. L.N.G. Rao, Varun Gupta, Vijay Kumar

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Testicular descent can be described in two phases, the transabdominal and the inguinoscrotal. During the inguinoscrotal phase, the testis may deviate from the normal path of descent and "migrate" to an abnormal location; this is called ectopic testis and is a relatively uncommon condition. The common sites for ectopic testes include the superficial inguinal pouch, the perineum, the opposite side of the scrotum, the femoral canal, and the pubopenile region. In addition to these well-recognized sites, preperitoneal and extracorporeal ectopic testes, which are extremely rare, have been reported. We report yet another rare site for ectopic testis, the anterior abdominal wall, probably the first of its nature to be reported in the English literature.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)687-688
Number of pages2
JournalPediatric Surgery International
Volume21
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 01-08-2005

Fingerprint

Abdominal Wall
Testis
Literature
Perineum
Scrotum
Groin
Thigh

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Surgery

Cite this

Rao, P. L.N.G. ; Gupta, Varun ; Kumar, Vijay. / Anterior abdominal wall - An unusual site for ectopic testis. In: Pediatric Surgery International. 2005 ; Vol. 21, No. 8. pp. 687-688.
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Anterior abdominal wall - An unusual site for ectopic testis. / Rao, P. L.N.G.; Gupta, Varun; Kumar, Vijay.

In: Pediatric Surgery International, Vol. 21, No. 8, 01.08.2005, p. 687-688.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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