Baseline risk factors for incidence of blindness in a South Indian population

The Chennai eye disease incidence study

Lingam Vijaya, Rashima Asokan, Manish Panday, Nikhil S. Choudhari, Sathyamangalam Ve Ramesh, Lokapavani Velumuri, Sachi Devi Boddupalli, Govindan T. Sunil, Ronnie George

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

PURPOSE. To report the baseline risk factors and causes for incident blindness.

METHODS. Six years after the baseline study, 4419 subjects from the cohort underwent a detailed examination at the base hospital. Incident blindness was defined by World Health Organization criteria as visual acuity of less than 6/120 (3/60) and/or a visual field of less than 108 in the better-seeing eye at the 6-year follow-up, provided that the eye had a visual acuity of better than or equal to 6/120 (3/60) and visual field greater than 108 at baseline. For incident monocular blindness, both eyes should have visual acuity of more than 6/120 (3/60) at baseline and developed visual acuity of less than 6/120 (3/60) in one eye at 6-year follow-up.

RESULTS. For incident blindness, 21 participants (0.48%, 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.3–0.7) became blind; significant baseline risk factors were increasing age (P = 0.001), smokeless tobacco use (P < 0.001), and no history of cataract surgery (P = 0.02). Incident monocular blindness was found in 132 participants (3.8%, 95% CI, 3.7–3.8); it was significantly more (P < 0.001) in the rural population (5.4%, 95% CI, 5.4–5.5) than in the urban population (1.9%, 95% CI, 1.8–1.9). Baseline risk factors (P < 0.001) were increasing age and rural residence, and no history of cataract surgery was a protective factor (P = 0.03).

CONCLUSIONS. Increasing age was a significant risk factor for blindness and monocular blindness. No history of cataract surgery was a risk factor for blindness and a protective factor for monocular blindness.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)5545-5550
Number of pages6
JournalInvestigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science
Volume55
Issue number9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 01-01-2014

Fingerprint

Eye Diseases
Blindness
Cohort Studies
Incidence
Population
Visual Acuity
Confidence Intervals
Cataract
Visual Fields
Smokeless Tobacco
Urban Population
Tobacco Use
Rural Population

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Ophthalmology
  • Sensory Systems
  • Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience

Cite this

Vijaya, Lingam ; Asokan, Rashima ; Panday, Manish ; Choudhari, Nikhil S. ; Ramesh, Sathyamangalam Ve ; Velumuri, Lokapavani ; Boddupalli, Sachi Devi ; Sunil, Govindan T. ; George, Ronnie. / Baseline risk factors for incidence of blindness in a South Indian population : The Chennai eye disease incidence study. In: Investigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science. 2014 ; Vol. 55, No. 9. pp. 5545-5550.
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abstract = "PURPOSE. To report the baseline risk factors and causes for incident blindness.METHODS. Six years after the baseline study, 4419 subjects from the cohort underwent a detailed examination at the base hospital. Incident blindness was defined by World Health Organization criteria as visual acuity of less than 6/120 (3/60) and/or a visual field of less than 108 in the better-seeing eye at the 6-year follow-up, provided that the eye had a visual acuity of better than or equal to 6/120 (3/60) and visual field greater than 108 at baseline. For incident monocular blindness, both eyes should have visual acuity of more than 6/120 (3/60) at baseline and developed visual acuity of less than 6/120 (3/60) in one eye at 6-year follow-up.RESULTS. For incident blindness, 21 participants (0.48{\%}, 95{\%} confidence interval [CI], 0.3–0.7) became blind; significant baseline risk factors were increasing age (P = 0.001), smokeless tobacco use (P < 0.001), and no history of cataract surgery (P = 0.02). Incident monocular blindness was found in 132 participants (3.8{\%}, 95{\%} CI, 3.7–3.8); it was significantly more (P < 0.001) in the rural population (5.4{\%}, 95{\%} CI, 5.4–5.5) than in the urban population (1.9{\%}, 95{\%} CI, 1.8–1.9). Baseline risk factors (P < 0.001) were increasing age and rural residence, and no history of cataract surgery was a protective factor (P = 0.03).CONCLUSIONS. Increasing age was a significant risk factor for blindness and monocular blindness. No history of cataract surgery was a risk factor for blindness and a protective factor for monocular blindness.",
author = "Lingam Vijaya and Rashima Asokan and Manish Panday and Choudhari, {Nikhil S.} and Ramesh, {Sathyamangalam Ve} and Lokapavani Velumuri and Boddupalli, {Sachi Devi} and Sunil, {Govindan T.} and Ronnie George",
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Vijaya, L, Asokan, R, Panday, M, Choudhari, NS, Ramesh, SV, Velumuri, L, Boddupalli, SD, Sunil, GT & George, R 2014, 'Baseline risk factors for incidence of blindness in a South Indian population: The Chennai eye disease incidence study', Investigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science, vol. 55, no. 9, pp. 5545-5550. https://doi.org/10.1167/iovs.14-14614

Baseline risk factors for incidence of blindness in a South Indian population : The Chennai eye disease incidence study. / Vijaya, Lingam; Asokan, Rashima; Panday, Manish; Choudhari, Nikhil S.; Ramesh, Sathyamangalam Ve; Velumuri, Lokapavani; Boddupalli, Sachi Devi; Sunil, Govindan T.; George, Ronnie.

In: Investigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science, Vol. 55, No. 9, 01.01.2014, p. 5545-5550.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Baseline risk factors for incidence of blindness in a South Indian population

T2 - The Chennai eye disease incidence study

AU - Vijaya, Lingam

AU - Asokan, Rashima

AU - Panday, Manish

AU - Choudhari, Nikhil S.

AU - Ramesh, Sathyamangalam Ve

AU - Velumuri, Lokapavani

AU - Boddupalli, Sachi Devi

AU - Sunil, Govindan T.

AU - George, Ronnie

PY - 2014/1/1

Y1 - 2014/1/1

N2 - PURPOSE. To report the baseline risk factors and causes for incident blindness.METHODS. Six years after the baseline study, 4419 subjects from the cohort underwent a detailed examination at the base hospital. Incident blindness was defined by World Health Organization criteria as visual acuity of less than 6/120 (3/60) and/or a visual field of less than 108 in the better-seeing eye at the 6-year follow-up, provided that the eye had a visual acuity of better than or equal to 6/120 (3/60) and visual field greater than 108 at baseline. For incident monocular blindness, both eyes should have visual acuity of more than 6/120 (3/60) at baseline and developed visual acuity of less than 6/120 (3/60) in one eye at 6-year follow-up.RESULTS. For incident blindness, 21 participants (0.48%, 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.3–0.7) became blind; significant baseline risk factors were increasing age (P = 0.001), smokeless tobacco use (P < 0.001), and no history of cataract surgery (P = 0.02). Incident monocular blindness was found in 132 participants (3.8%, 95% CI, 3.7–3.8); it was significantly more (P < 0.001) in the rural population (5.4%, 95% CI, 5.4–5.5) than in the urban population (1.9%, 95% CI, 1.8–1.9). Baseline risk factors (P < 0.001) were increasing age and rural residence, and no history of cataract surgery was a protective factor (P = 0.03).CONCLUSIONS. Increasing age was a significant risk factor for blindness and monocular blindness. No history of cataract surgery was a risk factor for blindness and a protective factor for monocular blindness.

AB - PURPOSE. To report the baseline risk factors and causes for incident blindness.METHODS. Six years after the baseline study, 4419 subjects from the cohort underwent a detailed examination at the base hospital. Incident blindness was defined by World Health Organization criteria as visual acuity of less than 6/120 (3/60) and/or a visual field of less than 108 in the better-seeing eye at the 6-year follow-up, provided that the eye had a visual acuity of better than or equal to 6/120 (3/60) and visual field greater than 108 at baseline. For incident monocular blindness, both eyes should have visual acuity of more than 6/120 (3/60) at baseline and developed visual acuity of less than 6/120 (3/60) in one eye at 6-year follow-up.RESULTS. For incident blindness, 21 participants (0.48%, 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.3–0.7) became blind; significant baseline risk factors were increasing age (P = 0.001), smokeless tobacco use (P < 0.001), and no history of cataract surgery (P = 0.02). Incident monocular blindness was found in 132 participants (3.8%, 95% CI, 3.7–3.8); it was significantly more (P < 0.001) in the rural population (5.4%, 95% CI, 5.4–5.5) than in the urban population (1.9%, 95% CI, 1.8–1.9). Baseline risk factors (P < 0.001) were increasing age and rural residence, and no history of cataract surgery was a protective factor (P = 0.03).CONCLUSIONS. Increasing age was a significant risk factor for blindness and monocular blindness. No history of cataract surgery was a risk factor for blindness and a protective factor for monocular blindness.

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