Baseline risk factors for incidence of blindness in a South Indian population: The Chennai eye disease incidence study

Lingam Vijaya, Rashima Asokan, Manish Panday, Nikhil S. Choudhari, Sathyamangalam Ve Ramesh, Lokapavani Velumuri, Sachi Devi Boddupalli, Govindan T. Sunil, Ronnie George

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

PURPOSE. To report the baseline risk factors and causes for incident blindness.

METHODS. Six years after the baseline study, 4419 subjects from the cohort underwent a detailed examination at the base hospital. Incident blindness was defined by World Health Organization criteria as visual acuity of less than 6/120 (3/60) and/or a visual field of less than 108 in the better-seeing eye at the 6-year follow-up, provided that the eye had a visual acuity of better than or equal to 6/120 (3/60) and visual field greater than 108 at baseline. For incident monocular blindness, both eyes should have visual acuity of more than 6/120 (3/60) at baseline and developed visual acuity of less than 6/120 (3/60) in one eye at 6-year follow-up.

RESULTS. For incident blindness, 21 participants (0.48%, 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.3–0.7) became blind; significant baseline risk factors were increasing age (P = 0.001), smokeless tobacco use (P < 0.001), and no history of cataract surgery (P = 0.02). Incident monocular blindness was found in 132 participants (3.8%, 95% CI, 3.7–3.8); it was significantly more (P < 0.001) in the rural population (5.4%, 95% CI, 5.4–5.5) than in the urban population (1.9%, 95% CI, 1.8–1.9). Baseline risk factors (P < 0.001) were increasing age and rural residence, and no history of cataract surgery was a protective factor (P = 0.03).

CONCLUSIONS. Increasing age was a significant risk factor for blindness and monocular blindness. No history of cataract surgery was a risk factor for blindness and a protective factor for monocular blindness.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)5545-5550
Number of pages6
JournalInvestigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science
Volume55
Issue number9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 01-01-2014

Fingerprint

Eye Diseases
Blindness
Cohort Studies
Incidence
Population
Visual Acuity
Confidence Intervals
Cataract
Visual Fields
Smokeless Tobacco
Urban Population
Tobacco Use
Rural Population

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Ophthalmology
  • Sensory Systems
  • Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience

Cite this

Vijaya, Lingam ; Asokan, Rashima ; Panday, Manish ; Choudhari, Nikhil S. ; Ramesh, Sathyamangalam Ve ; Velumuri, Lokapavani ; Boddupalli, Sachi Devi ; Sunil, Govindan T. ; George, Ronnie. / Baseline risk factors for incidence of blindness in a South Indian population : The Chennai eye disease incidence study. In: Investigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science. 2014 ; Vol. 55, No. 9. pp. 5545-5550.
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abstract = "PURPOSE. To report the baseline risk factors and causes for incident blindness.METHODS. Six years after the baseline study, 4419 subjects from the cohort underwent a detailed examination at the base hospital. Incident blindness was defined by World Health Organization criteria as visual acuity of less than 6/120 (3/60) and/or a visual field of less than 108 in the better-seeing eye at the 6-year follow-up, provided that the eye had a visual acuity of better than or equal to 6/120 (3/60) and visual field greater than 108 at baseline. For incident monocular blindness, both eyes should have visual acuity of more than 6/120 (3/60) at baseline and developed visual acuity of less than 6/120 (3/60) in one eye at 6-year follow-up.RESULTS. For incident blindness, 21 participants (0.48{\%}, 95{\%} confidence interval [CI], 0.3–0.7) became blind; significant baseline risk factors were increasing age (P = 0.001), smokeless tobacco use (P < 0.001), and no history of cataract surgery (P = 0.02). Incident monocular blindness was found in 132 participants (3.8{\%}, 95{\%} CI, 3.7–3.8); it was significantly more (P < 0.001) in the rural population (5.4{\%}, 95{\%} CI, 5.4–5.5) than in the urban population (1.9{\%}, 95{\%} CI, 1.8–1.9). Baseline risk factors (P < 0.001) were increasing age and rural residence, and no history of cataract surgery was a protective factor (P = 0.03).CONCLUSIONS. Increasing age was a significant risk factor for blindness and monocular blindness. No history of cataract surgery was a risk factor for blindness and a protective factor for monocular blindness.",
author = "Lingam Vijaya and Rashima Asokan and Manish Panday and Choudhari, {Nikhil S.} and Ramesh, {Sathyamangalam Ve} and Lokapavani Velumuri and Boddupalli, {Sachi Devi} and Sunil, {Govindan T.} and Ronnie George",
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Vijaya, L, Asokan, R, Panday, M, Choudhari, NS, Ramesh, SV, Velumuri, L, Boddupalli, SD, Sunil, GT & George, R 2014, 'Baseline risk factors for incidence of blindness in a South Indian population: The Chennai eye disease incidence study', Investigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science, vol. 55, no. 9, pp. 5545-5550. https://doi.org/10.1167/iovs.14-14614

Baseline risk factors for incidence of blindness in a South Indian population : The Chennai eye disease incidence study. / Vijaya, Lingam; Asokan, Rashima; Panday, Manish; Choudhari, Nikhil S.; Ramesh, Sathyamangalam Ve; Velumuri, Lokapavani; Boddupalli, Sachi Devi; Sunil, Govindan T.; George, Ronnie.

In: Investigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science, Vol. 55, No. 9, 01.01.2014, p. 5545-5550.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Baseline risk factors for incidence of blindness in a South Indian population

T2 - The Chennai eye disease incidence study

AU - Vijaya, Lingam

AU - Asokan, Rashima

AU - Panday, Manish

AU - Choudhari, Nikhil S.

AU - Ramesh, Sathyamangalam Ve

AU - Velumuri, Lokapavani

AU - Boddupalli, Sachi Devi

AU - Sunil, Govindan T.

AU - George, Ronnie

PY - 2014/1/1

Y1 - 2014/1/1

N2 - PURPOSE. To report the baseline risk factors and causes for incident blindness.METHODS. Six years after the baseline study, 4419 subjects from the cohort underwent a detailed examination at the base hospital. Incident blindness was defined by World Health Organization criteria as visual acuity of less than 6/120 (3/60) and/or a visual field of less than 108 in the better-seeing eye at the 6-year follow-up, provided that the eye had a visual acuity of better than or equal to 6/120 (3/60) and visual field greater than 108 at baseline. For incident monocular blindness, both eyes should have visual acuity of more than 6/120 (3/60) at baseline and developed visual acuity of less than 6/120 (3/60) in one eye at 6-year follow-up.RESULTS. For incident blindness, 21 participants (0.48%, 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.3–0.7) became blind; significant baseline risk factors were increasing age (P = 0.001), smokeless tobacco use (P < 0.001), and no history of cataract surgery (P = 0.02). Incident monocular blindness was found in 132 participants (3.8%, 95% CI, 3.7–3.8); it was significantly more (P < 0.001) in the rural population (5.4%, 95% CI, 5.4–5.5) than in the urban population (1.9%, 95% CI, 1.8–1.9). Baseline risk factors (P < 0.001) were increasing age and rural residence, and no history of cataract surgery was a protective factor (P = 0.03).CONCLUSIONS. Increasing age was a significant risk factor for blindness and monocular blindness. No history of cataract surgery was a risk factor for blindness and a protective factor for monocular blindness.

AB - PURPOSE. To report the baseline risk factors and causes for incident blindness.METHODS. Six years after the baseline study, 4419 subjects from the cohort underwent a detailed examination at the base hospital. Incident blindness was defined by World Health Organization criteria as visual acuity of less than 6/120 (3/60) and/or a visual field of less than 108 in the better-seeing eye at the 6-year follow-up, provided that the eye had a visual acuity of better than or equal to 6/120 (3/60) and visual field greater than 108 at baseline. For incident monocular blindness, both eyes should have visual acuity of more than 6/120 (3/60) at baseline and developed visual acuity of less than 6/120 (3/60) in one eye at 6-year follow-up.RESULTS. For incident blindness, 21 participants (0.48%, 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.3–0.7) became blind; significant baseline risk factors were increasing age (P = 0.001), smokeless tobacco use (P < 0.001), and no history of cataract surgery (P = 0.02). Incident monocular blindness was found in 132 participants (3.8%, 95% CI, 3.7–3.8); it was significantly more (P < 0.001) in the rural population (5.4%, 95% CI, 5.4–5.5) than in the urban population (1.9%, 95% CI, 1.8–1.9). Baseline risk factors (P < 0.001) were increasing age and rural residence, and no history of cataract surgery was a protective factor (P = 0.03).CONCLUSIONS. Increasing age was a significant risk factor for blindness and monocular blindness. No history of cataract surgery was a risk factor for blindness and a protective factor for monocular blindness.

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