Brucella meningoencephalitis with hydrocephalus masquerading as tuberculosis

Vishwanath Sathyanarayanan, Bekur Ragini, Abdul Razak, M. Mukhya prana Prabhu

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Neurobrucellosis is a rare form of localized brucellosis usually with no systemic manifestations. We report a rare case of brucellosis presenting as meningoencephalitis associated with hydrocephalus. This patient had a lymphocytic predominant CSF and was initially treated with empirical anti tubercular therapy and steroids. A week later, when his CSF culture grew Brucella species, the treatment was changed to a combination of streptomycin, doxycycline and rifampicin and the patient improved with this therapy. This case illustrates the need to consider neurobrucellosis as a close differential diagnosis of neurotuberculosis in endemic areas when the patient presents with meningo encephalitis with lymphocytic CSF.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)835-837
Number of pages3
JournalAsian Pacific Journal of Tropical Medicine
Volume3
Issue number10
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 01-10-2010

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Brucella
Meningoencephalitis
Hydrocephalus
Tuberculosis
Brucellosis
Doxycycline
Streptomycin
Encephalitis
Rifampin
Differential Diagnosis
Therapeutics
Steroids

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

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Brucella meningoencephalitis with hydrocephalus masquerading as tuberculosis. / Sathyanarayanan, Vishwanath; Ragini, Bekur; Razak, Abdul; Prabhu, M. Mukhya prana.

In: Asian Pacific Journal of Tropical Medicine, Vol. 3, No. 10, 01.10.2010, p. 835-837.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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