Calcified embolism: A rare cause of cerebral infarction

Vijay Chandran, Aparna Pai, Suryanarayana Rao

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Calcified cerebral emboli (CCE) are a rare cause of stroke and these emboli can be identified on a CT scan of the brain performed for the initial evaluation of stroke. In this report we present a patient who developed a CCE following cardiac catheterisation that lodged in the left middle cerebral artery with resultant right hemiparesis and aphasia. The calcified embolus was seen on CT but could not be identified on MRI. Predisposing factors for CCE include angiography and valve or vessel wall calcification. The natural history and response to standard therapy in patients with CCE as compared with stroke of other aetiologies have not been studied until now. Increased awareness and ability to identify calcified emboli will help us to have an improved understanding of strokes resulting from CCE.

Original languageEnglish
JournalBMJ Case Reports
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 11-06-2013
Externally publishedYes

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Intracranial Embolism
Cerebral Infarction
Embolism
Stroke
Aphasia
Middle Cerebral Artery
Paresis
Cardiac Catheterization
Natural History
Causality
Angiography
Brain

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Chandran, Vijay ; Pai, Aparna ; Rao, Suryanarayana. / Calcified embolism : A rare cause of cerebral infarction. In: BMJ Case Reports. 2013.
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Calcified embolism : A rare cause of cerebral infarction. / Chandran, Vijay; Pai, Aparna; Rao, Suryanarayana.

In: BMJ Case Reports, 11.06.2013.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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