Can microteaching be used for teaching postgraduate psychiatry residents in a small group?

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: The objective of this study was to examine the feasibility of using microteaching for teaching postgraduate psychiatry residents in a small-group setting. Methods: Twelve postgraduate psychiatry residents attending the tutorial program were employed as study participants. Five of the consenting residents took part in the microteaching session in which subtopics were assigned. Feedback was obtained from the presenters and other participants regarding the microteaching session. Results: All of the presenters reported the microteaching session to be helpful in gaining a deeper understanding of the topic. Among the other participants, most found the microteaching exercise to be useful. Conclusion: Although preliminary, our findings suggest that microteaching can be used for training postgraduate psychiatry residents.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)305-307
Number of pages3
JournalAustralasian Psychiatry
Volume24
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 01-01-2016

Fingerprint

Psychiatry
Teaching

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

@article{ddaf527974f642088428f907e61e434e,
title = "Can microteaching be used for teaching postgraduate psychiatry residents in a small group?",
abstract = "Objective: The objective of this study was to examine the feasibility of using microteaching for teaching postgraduate psychiatry residents in a small-group setting. Methods: Twelve postgraduate psychiatry residents attending the tutorial program were employed as study participants. Five of the consenting residents took part in the microteaching session in which subtopics were assigned. Feedback was obtained from the presenters and other participants regarding the microteaching session. Results: All of the presenters reported the microteaching session to be helpful in gaining a deeper understanding of the topic. Among the other participants, most found the microteaching exercise to be useful. Conclusion: Although preliminary, our findings suggest that microteaching can be used for training postgraduate psychiatry residents.",
author = "Praharaj, {Samir Kumar}",
year = "2016",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1177/1039856216638791",
language = "English",
volume = "24",
pages = "305--307",
journal = "Australasian Psychiatry",
issn = "1039-8562",
publisher = "Informa Healthcare",
number = "3",

}

Can microteaching be used for teaching postgraduate psychiatry residents in a small group? / Praharaj, Samir Kumar.

In: Australasian Psychiatry, Vol. 24, No. 3, 01.01.2016, p. 305-307.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Can microteaching be used for teaching postgraduate psychiatry residents in a small group?

AU - Praharaj, Samir Kumar

PY - 2016/1/1

Y1 - 2016/1/1

N2 - Objective: The objective of this study was to examine the feasibility of using microteaching for teaching postgraduate psychiatry residents in a small-group setting. Methods: Twelve postgraduate psychiatry residents attending the tutorial program were employed as study participants. Five of the consenting residents took part in the microteaching session in which subtopics were assigned. Feedback was obtained from the presenters and other participants regarding the microteaching session. Results: All of the presenters reported the microteaching session to be helpful in gaining a deeper understanding of the topic. Among the other participants, most found the microteaching exercise to be useful. Conclusion: Although preliminary, our findings suggest that microteaching can be used for training postgraduate psychiatry residents.

AB - Objective: The objective of this study was to examine the feasibility of using microteaching for teaching postgraduate psychiatry residents in a small-group setting. Methods: Twelve postgraduate psychiatry residents attending the tutorial program were employed as study participants. Five of the consenting residents took part in the microteaching session in which subtopics were assigned. Feedback was obtained from the presenters and other participants regarding the microteaching session. Results: All of the presenters reported the microteaching session to be helpful in gaining a deeper understanding of the topic. Among the other participants, most found the microteaching exercise to be useful. Conclusion: Although preliminary, our findings suggest that microteaching can be used for training postgraduate psychiatry residents.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84978658361&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84978658361&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1177/1039856216638791

DO - 10.1177/1039856216638791

M3 - Article

C2 - 26988229

AN - SCOPUS:84978658361

VL - 24

SP - 305

EP - 307

JO - Australasian Psychiatry

JF - Australasian Psychiatry

SN - 1039-8562

IS - 3

ER -