Cervicobrachial pain - How often is it neurogenic?

Ranganath Gangavelli, N. Sreekumaran Nair, Anil K. Bhat, John M. Solomon

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Introduction: Neck pain associated with pain in the arm (cervicobrachial pain) is a common complaint in patients seeking physiotherapy management. The source of symptoms for this complaint is commonly presumed to be neural. However, this pain pattern could also result from various other innervated tissue structures of the upper quarter. Knowledge about frequency of neural structures being a predominant source of symptoms would help in implementing appropriate therapeutic strategies such as neural tissue mobilization along with other complimentary therapies for optimal outcomes. Aim: To determine the frequency of cervicobrachial pain being neurogenic. Materials and Methods: Participants (n=361) aged between 20-65 years, reporting cervicobrachial pain were screened for neurogenic nature of symptoms. These physical signs included: active and passive movement dysfunction, adverse responses to neural tissue provocation tests, tenderness on palpating nerve trunks and related cutaneous tissues and evidence of a related local area of pathology (Clinical/radiological). The consistency of all these signs was checked to identify a significant neural involvement. Results: Descriptive statistics were used to analyse data. Of 361 participants, 206 were males (44.6 ±10.8 years) and 155 were females (41.8 ± 11.2 years). The frequency of neurogenic cervicobrachial pain was determined to be 19.9% (n=72) and the non-neurogenic sources for symptoms were attributed to 80.1% (n=289) of screened participants. Conclusion: Lower frequency of cervicobrachial pain being neurogenic indicates thorough screening for appropriate therapeutic interventions to be successful.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)14-16
Number of pages3
JournalJournal of Clinical and Diagnostic Research
Volume10
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 01-03-2016

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Tissue
Pain
Physical therapy
Pathology
Screening
Statistics
Clinical Pathology
Neck Pain
Therapeutics
Skin

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Clinical Biochemistry

Cite this

Gangavelli, Ranganath ; Sreekumaran Nair, N. ; Bhat, Anil K. ; Solomon, John M. / Cervicobrachial pain - How often is it neurogenic?. In: Journal of Clinical and Diagnostic Research. 2016 ; Vol. 10, No. 3. pp. 14-16.
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abstract = "Introduction: Neck pain associated with pain in the arm (cervicobrachial pain) is a common complaint in patients seeking physiotherapy management. The source of symptoms for this complaint is commonly presumed to be neural. However, this pain pattern could also result from various other innervated tissue structures of the upper quarter. Knowledge about frequency of neural structures being a predominant source of symptoms would help in implementing appropriate therapeutic strategies such as neural tissue mobilization along with other complimentary therapies for optimal outcomes. Aim: To determine the frequency of cervicobrachial pain being neurogenic. Materials and Methods: Participants (n=361) aged between 20-65 years, reporting cervicobrachial pain were screened for neurogenic nature of symptoms. These physical signs included: active and passive movement dysfunction, adverse responses to neural tissue provocation tests, tenderness on palpating nerve trunks and related cutaneous tissues and evidence of a related local area of pathology (Clinical/radiological). The consistency of all these signs was checked to identify a significant neural involvement. Results: Descriptive statistics were used to analyse data. Of 361 participants, 206 were males (44.6 ±10.8 years) and 155 were females (41.8 ± 11.2 years). The frequency of neurogenic cervicobrachial pain was determined to be 19.9{\%} (n=72) and the non-neurogenic sources for symptoms were attributed to 80.1{\%} (n=289) of screened participants. Conclusion: Lower frequency of cervicobrachial pain being neurogenic indicates thorough screening for appropriate therapeutic interventions to be successful.",
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Cervicobrachial pain - How often is it neurogenic? / Gangavelli, Ranganath; Sreekumaran Nair, N.; Bhat, Anil K.; Solomon, John M.

In: Journal of Clinical and Diagnostic Research, Vol. 10, No. 3, 01.03.2016, p. 14-16.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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