Challenges in diagnosing lead poisoning: A review of occupationally and nonoccupationally exposed cases reported in India

Monica Shirley Mani, Divyani Gurudas Nayak, Herman Sunil Dsouza

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Lead is a nonessential metal which enters the body through various means and is considered as one of the most common health toxins. Several cases of lead poisoning are reported as a result of inhalation or ingestion of lead in employees working as painters, smelters, electric accumulator manufacturers, compositors, auto mechanics, and miners. In addition to occupational lead exposure, several cases of lead poisoning are reported in the general population through various sources and pathways. Innumerable signs and symptoms of lead poisoning observed are subtle and depend on the extent and duration of exposure. The objective of this review article is to discuss occupationally and nonoccupationally exposed lead poisoning cases reported in India and the associated symptoms, mode of therapy, and environmental intervention used in managing these cases. Lead poisoning cases cannot be identified at an early stage as the symptoms are very general and mimic that of other disorders, and patients might receive only symptomatic treatment. Knowledge about the various symptoms and potential sources is of utmost importance. Medical practitioners when confronted with patients experiencing signs and symptoms as discussed in this article can speculate the possibility of lead poisoning, which could lead to early diagnosis and its management.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)346-355
Number of pages10
JournalToxicology and Industrial Health
Volume36
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 01-05-2020

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Toxicology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Health, Toxicology and Mutagenesis

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