Child dental fear and behavior

The role of environmental factors in a hospital cohort

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

21 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Information on the origin of dental fear and uncooperative behavior in a child patient is important for behavior management strategy. The effects of environmental factors have been comparatively less studied, especially in an Indian scenario. Objectives: To find the association of (1) age, gender, family characteristics, previous medical, and dental experiences with dental fear and behavior (2) dental fear with dental behavior. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional questionnaire study involving 125 children aged between 7 and 14 years undergoing dental treatment under local anesthesia. The parent completed a questionnaire on family situation, medical history, and past dental experiences of the child. Child's dental fear was recorded using Children's Fear Survey Schedule-Dental Subscale and behavior was rated using Frankl Behaviour Rating Scale. Statistical Analysis: Data were analyzed using chi square test and binary logistic regression analysis. Results: Unpleasant experience in dental clinic and age of the child significantly influenced dental behavior. Visited pediatrician in the past one year, prior history of hospital admission, previous visit to dentist, experience at the first dental visit, and age of the child were contributing factors for dental fear. There was also significant association between dental fear levels and behavior. Conclusions: In 7 to 14 year olds, dental fear influences dental behavior, but the factors affecting them are not the same. Although dental fear decreases and dental behavior improves with age, experiences at the previous dental visits seem to influence both dental fear and behavior. Past medical experiences are likely to influence dental fear but not dental behavior.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)95-101
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Indian Society of Pedodontics and Preventive Dentistry
Volume29
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 01-04-2011

Fingerprint

Dental Anxiety
Tooth
Medical History Taking
Dental Clinics
Statistical Data Interpretation
Local Anesthesia
Chi-Square Distribution
Dentists
Fear
Appointments and Schedules

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Dentistry(all)

Cite this

@article{53d678d7d4ed44c289156c01cdcd4ce6,
title = "Child dental fear and behavior: The role of environmental factors in a hospital cohort",
abstract = "Information on the origin of dental fear and uncooperative behavior in a child patient is important for behavior management strategy. The effects of environmental factors have been comparatively less studied, especially in an Indian scenario. Objectives: To find the association of (1) age, gender, family characteristics, previous medical, and dental experiences with dental fear and behavior (2) dental fear with dental behavior. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional questionnaire study involving 125 children aged between 7 and 14 years undergoing dental treatment under local anesthesia. The parent completed a questionnaire on family situation, medical history, and past dental experiences of the child. Child's dental fear was recorded using Children's Fear Survey Schedule-Dental Subscale and behavior was rated using Frankl Behaviour Rating Scale. Statistical Analysis: Data were analyzed using chi square test and binary logistic regression analysis. Results: Unpleasant experience in dental clinic and age of the child significantly influenced dental behavior. Visited pediatrician in the past one year, prior history of hospital admission, previous visit to dentist, experience at the first dental visit, and age of the child were contributing factors for dental fear. There was also significant association between dental fear levels and behavior. Conclusions: In 7 to 14 year olds, dental fear influences dental behavior, but the factors affecting them are not the same. Although dental fear decreases and dental behavior improves with age, experiences at the previous dental visits seem to influence both dental fear and behavior. Past medical experiences are likely to influence dental fear but not dental behavior.",
author = "Suprabha, {B. S.} and Arathi Rao and Shwetha Choudhary and Ramya Shenoy",
year = "2011",
month = "4",
day = "1",
doi = "10.4103/0970-4388.84679",
language = "English",
volume = "29",
pages = "95--101",
journal = "Journal of the Indian Society of Pedodontics and Preventive Dentistry",
issn = "0970-4388",
publisher = "Medknow Publications and Media Pvt. Ltd",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Child dental fear and behavior

T2 - The role of environmental factors in a hospital cohort

AU - Suprabha, B. S.

AU - Rao, Arathi

AU - Choudhary, Shwetha

AU - Shenoy, Ramya

PY - 2011/4/1

Y1 - 2011/4/1

N2 - Information on the origin of dental fear and uncooperative behavior in a child patient is important for behavior management strategy. The effects of environmental factors have been comparatively less studied, especially in an Indian scenario. Objectives: To find the association of (1) age, gender, family characteristics, previous medical, and dental experiences with dental fear and behavior (2) dental fear with dental behavior. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional questionnaire study involving 125 children aged between 7 and 14 years undergoing dental treatment under local anesthesia. The parent completed a questionnaire on family situation, medical history, and past dental experiences of the child. Child's dental fear was recorded using Children's Fear Survey Schedule-Dental Subscale and behavior was rated using Frankl Behaviour Rating Scale. Statistical Analysis: Data were analyzed using chi square test and binary logistic regression analysis. Results: Unpleasant experience in dental clinic and age of the child significantly influenced dental behavior. Visited pediatrician in the past one year, prior history of hospital admission, previous visit to dentist, experience at the first dental visit, and age of the child were contributing factors for dental fear. There was also significant association between dental fear levels and behavior. Conclusions: In 7 to 14 year olds, dental fear influences dental behavior, but the factors affecting them are not the same. Although dental fear decreases and dental behavior improves with age, experiences at the previous dental visits seem to influence both dental fear and behavior. Past medical experiences are likely to influence dental fear but not dental behavior.

AB - Information on the origin of dental fear and uncooperative behavior in a child patient is important for behavior management strategy. The effects of environmental factors have been comparatively less studied, especially in an Indian scenario. Objectives: To find the association of (1) age, gender, family characteristics, previous medical, and dental experiences with dental fear and behavior (2) dental fear with dental behavior. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional questionnaire study involving 125 children aged between 7 and 14 years undergoing dental treatment under local anesthesia. The parent completed a questionnaire on family situation, medical history, and past dental experiences of the child. Child's dental fear was recorded using Children's Fear Survey Schedule-Dental Subscale and behavior was rated using Frankl Behaviour Rating Scale. Statistical Analysis: Data were analyzed using chi square test and binary logistic regression analysis. Results: Unpleasant experience in dental clinic and age of the child significantly influenced dental behavior. Visited pediatrician in the past one year, prior history of hospital admission, previous visit to dentist, experience at the first dental visit, and age of the child were contributing factors for dental fear. There was also significant association between dental fear levels and behavior. Conclusions: In 7 to 14 year olds, dental fear influences dental behavior, but the factors affecting them are not the same. Although dental fear decreases and dental behavior improves with age, experiences at the previous dental visits seem to influence both dental fear and behavior. Past medical experiences are likely to influence dental fear but not dental behavior.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=80052893486&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=80052893486&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.4103/0970-4388.84679

DO - 10.4103/0970-4388.84679

M3 - Article

VL - 29

SP - 95

EP - 101

JO - Journal of the Indian Society of Pedodontics and Preventive Dentistry

JF - Journal of the Indian Society of Pedodontics and Preventive Dentistry

SN - 0970-4388

IS - 2

ER -