Chronotypes and its association with psychological morbidity and childhood parasomnias

Ng Syiao Wei, Samir Kumar Praharaj

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: The relationship between chronotypes and sleeping problems is not clear. The objective of the study was to identify the relative occurrence of chronotypes among college students and to explore adult psychological morbidity and childhood sleeping problems across chronotypes. Materials and Methods: One hundred and fifty undergraduate medical students were assigned into different chronotypes by Morningness-Eveningness Questionnaire and they were further assessed using Self-Reporting Questionnaire, Parasomnia Questionnaire (adapted from the Adult Sleep Disorders Questionnaire), and Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index. Results: Intermediate chronotype was the most common, seen in 87 (58%) students, followed by evening type in 34 (22.7%). Evening types have more difficulties in making a decision, becoming exhausted more easily and feeling worthless than other chronotypes. Evening-oriented students showed a significantly higher frequency of initial insomnia and poorer overall sleep quality than the other groups. The current bedwetting was more in evening types; there was no difference in any other current and childhood parasomnias. Conclusions: Evening chronotypes had greater difficulty in decision-making, and they were more vulnerable to feel worthless. No significant association was found between childhood parasomnias and chronotypes except persistent bedwetting during adulthood in evening types.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)598-604
Number of pages7
JournalIndian Journal of Psychiatry
Volume61
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 01-11-2019

Fingerprint

Parasomnias
Psychology
Nocturnal Enuresis
Morbidity
Students
Decision Making
Sleep
Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders
Medical Students
Emotions
Surveys and Questionnaires

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

@article{57770c1f231b41fab69fb77211873872,
title = "Chronotypes and its association with psychological morbidity and childhood parasomnias",
abstract = "Background: The relationship between chronotypes and sleeping problems is not clear. The objective of the study was to identify the relative occurrence of chronotypes among college students and to explore adult psychological morbidity and childhood sleeping problems across chronotypes. Materials and Methods: One hundred and fifty undergraduate medical students were assigned into different chronotypes by Morningness-Eveningness Questionnaire and they were further assessed using Self-Reporting Questionnaire, Parasomnia Questionnaire (adapted from the Adult Sleep Disorders Questionnaire), and Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index. Results: Intermediate chronotype was the most common, seen in 87 (58{\%}) students, followed by evening type in 34 (22.7{\%}). Evening types have more difficulties in making a decision, becoming exhausted more easily and feeling worthless than other chronotypes. Evening-oriented students showed a significantly higher frequency of initial insomnia and poorer overall sleep quality than the other groups. The current bedwetting was more in evening types; there was no difference in any other current and childhood parasomnias. Conclusions: Evening chronotypes had greater difficulty in decision-making, and they were more vulnerable to feel worthless. No significant association was found between childhood parasomnias and chronotypes except persistent bedwetting during adulthood in evening types.",
author = "Wei, {Ng Syiao} and Praharaj, {Samir Kumar}",
year = "2019",
month = "11",
day = "1",
doi = "10.4103/psychiatry.IndianJPsychiatry_208_19",
language = "English",
volume = "61",
pages = "598--604",
journal = "Indian Journal of Psychiatry",
issn = "0019-5545",
publisher = "Medknow Publications and Media Pvt. Ltd",
number = "6",

}

Chronotypes and its association with psychological morbidity and childhood parasomnias. / Wei, Ng Syiao; Praharaj, Samir Kumar.

In: Indian Journal of Psychiatry, Vol. 61, No. 6, 01.11.2019, p. 598-604.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Chronotypes and its association with psychological morbidity and childhood parasomnias

AU - Wei, Ng Syiao

AU - Praharaj, Samir Kumar

PY - 2019/11/1

Y1 - 2019/11/1

N2 - Background: The relationship between chronotypes and sleeping problems is not clear. The objective of the study was to identify the relative occurrence of chronotypes among college students and to explore adult psychological morbidity and childhood sleeping problems across chronotypes. Materials and Methods: One hundred and fifty undergraduate medical students were assigned into different chronotypes by Morningness-Eveningness Questionnaire and they were further assessed using Self-Reporting Questionnaire, Parasomnia Questionnaire (adapted from the Adult Sleep Disorders Questionnaire), and Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index. Results: Intermediate chronotype was the most common, seen in 87 (58%) students, followed by evening type in 34 (22.7%). Evening types have more difficulties in making a decision, becoming exhausted more easily and feeling worthless than other chronotypes. Evening-oriented students showed a significantly higher frequency of initial insomnia and poorer overall sleep quality than the other groups. The current bedwetting was more in evening types; there was no difference in any other current and childhood parasomnias. Conclusions: Evening chronotypes had greater difficulty in decision-making, and they were more vulnerable to feel worthless. No significant association was found between childhood parasomnias and chronotypes except persistent bedwetting during adulthood in evening types.

AB - Background: The relationship between chronotypes and sleeping problems is not clear. The objective of the study was to identify the relative occurrence of chronotypes among college students and to explore adult psychological morbidity and childhood sleeping problems across chronotypes. Materials and Methods: One hundred and fifty undergraduate medical students were assigned into different chronotypes by Morningness-Eveningness Questionnaire and they were further assessed using Self-Reporting Questionnaire, Parasomnia Questionnaire (adapted from the Adult Sleep Disorders Questionnaire), and Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index. Results: Intermediate chronotype was the most common, seen in 87 (58%) students, followed by evening type in 34 (22.7%). Evening types have more difficulties in making a decision, becoming exhausted more easily and feeling worthless than other chronotypes. Evening-oriented students showed a significantly higher frequency of initial insomnia and poorer overall sleep quality than the other groups. The current bedwetting was more in evening types; there was no difference in any other current and childhood parasomnias. Conclusions: Evening chronotypes had greater difficulty in decision-making, and they were more vulnerable to feel worthless. No significant association was found between childhood parasomnias and chronotypes except persistent bedwetting during adulthood in evening types.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85074929741&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85074929741&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.4103/psychiatry.IndianJPsychiatry_208_19

DO - 10.4103/psychiatry.IndianJPsychiatry_208_19

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:85074929741

VL - 61

SP - 598

EP - 604

JO - Indian Journal of Psychiatry

JF - Indian Journal of Psychiatry

SN - 0019-5545

IS - 6

ER -