Clinical - microbiological characterization and risk factors of mortality in infective endocarditis from a tertiary care academic hospital in Southern India

Prasanna Subbaraju, Shipra Rai, Jwalit Morakhia, Geet Midha, Asha Kamath, Kavitha Saravu

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Abstract

Aims: To dissect the clinical-microbiological profile of Infective endocarditis (IE) population and to determine the risk factors for IE related mortality. Methods: A cohort study was conducted using relevant data from clinical records of patients (≥12. years) with definite/possible IE from December 2007 to December 2013 and was analyzed using appropriate statistical tests. Results: In the cohort of 139 IE patients, mean age was 47.9. ±. 15.8. years, with male preponderance (68.3%). Rheumatic heart disease was the commonest (30.9%) underlying cardiac lesion followed by mitral valve prolapse with mitral regurgitation (23.7%), degenerative valvular disease (23%), congenital heart disease (15.8%) and prosthetic valves (3.6%). Vegetations were detected in 94.2% cases. Blood cultures were positive in 69.8% cases, commonest organism isolated was α - hemolytic streptococci (30.9%) followed by Enterococcus (12.9%) and methicillin sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (10.8%). Complications observed were congestive cardiac failure (31.2%), acute kidney injury (25.9%), stroke (21.6%), septic shock (16.5%), embolic phenomenon non-stroke (8.6%), atrial fibrillation (5%) and ring abscess (2.9%). Mortality rate was 17.3%. Congestive cardiac failure, increase in the peak leucocyte count and stroke were the independent predictors of mortality. Conclusions: This study reiterates the persistent dominance of rheumatic heart disease in the population studied and α - haemolytic Streptococci as the commonest responsible microorganism.

Original languageEnglish
JournalIndian Heart Journal
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 01-01-2018

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Tertiary Healthcare
Endocarditis
India
Rheumatic Heart Disease
Mortality
Streptococcus
Heart Failure
Stroke
Mitral Valve Prolapse
Methicillin
Enterococcus
Mitral Valve Insufficiency
Septic Shock
Leukocyte Count
Acute Kidney Injury
Abscess
Atrial Fibrillation
Population
Staphylococcus aureus
Heart Diseases

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

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title = "Clinical - microbiological characterization and risk factors of mortality in infective endocarditis from a tertiary care academic hospital in Southern India",
abstract = "Aims: To dissect the clinical-microbiological profile of Infective endocarditis (IE) population and to determine the risk factors for IE related mortality. Methods: A cohort study was conducted using relevant data from clinical records of patients (≥12. years) with definite/possible IE from December 2007 to December 2013 and was analyzed using appropriate statistical tests. Results: In the cohort of 139 IE patients, mean age was 47.9. ±. 15.8. years, with male preponderance (68.3{\%}). Rheumatic heart disease was the commonest (30.9{\%}) underlying cardiac lesion followed by mitral valve prolapse with mitral regurgitation (23.7{\%}), degenerative valvular disease (23{\%}), congenital heart disease (15.8{\%}) and prosthetic valves (3.6{\%}). Vegetations were detected in 94.2{\%} cases. Blood cultures were positive in 69.8{\%} cases, commonest organism isolated was α - hemolytic streptococci (30.9{\%}) followed by Enterococcus (12.9{\%}) and methicillin sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (10.8{\%}). Complications observed were congestive cardiac failure (31.2{\%}), acute kidney injury (25.9{\%}), stroke (21.6{\%}), septic shock (16.5{\%}), embolic phenomenon non-stroke (8.6{\%}), atrial fibrillation (5{\%}) and ring abscess (2.9{\%}). Mortality rate was 17.3{\%}. Congestive cardiac failure, increase in the peak leucocyte count and stroke were the independent predictors of mortality. Conclusions: This study reiterates the persistent dominance of rheumatic heart disease in the population studied and α - haemolytic Streptococci as the commonest responsible microorganism.",
author = "Prasanna Subbaraju and Shipra Rai and Jwalit Morakhia and Geet Midha and Asha Kamath and Kavitha Saravu",
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doi = "10.1016/j.ihj.2017.08.007",
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T1 - Clinical - microbiological characterization and risk factors of mortality in infective endocarditis from a tertiary care academic hospital in Southern India

AU - Subbaraju, Prasanna

AU - Rai, Shipra

AU - Morakhia, Jwalit

AU - Midha, Geet

AU - Kamath, Asha

AU - Saravu, Kavitha

PY - 2018/1/1

Y1 - 2018/1/1

N2 - Aims: To dissect the clinical-microbiological profile of Infective endocarditis (IE) population and to determine the risk factors for IE related mortality. Methods: A cohort study was conducted using relevant data from clinical records of patients (≥12. years) with definite/possible IE from December 2007 to December 2013 and was analyzed using appropriate statistical tests. Results: In the cohort of 139 IE patients, mean age was 47.9. ±. 15.8. years, with male preponderance (68.3%). Rheumatic heart disease was the commonest (30.9%) underlying cardiac lesion followed by mitral valve prolapse with mitral regurgitation (23.7%), degenerative valvular disease (23%), congenital heart disease (15.8%) and prosthetic valves (3.6%). Vegetations were detected in 94.2% cases. Blood cultures were positive in 69.8% cases, commonest organism isolated was α - hemolytic streptococci (30.9%) followed by Enterococcus (12.9%) and methicillin sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (10.8%). Complications observed were congestive cardiac failure (31.2%), acute kidney injury (25.9%), stroke (21.6%), septic shock (16.5%), embolic phenomenon non-stroke (8.6%), atrial fibrillation (5%) and ring abscess (2.9%). Mortality rate was 17.3%. Congestive cardiac failure, increase in the peak leucocyte count and stroke were the independent predictors of mortality. Conclusions: This study reiterates the persistent dominance of rheumatic heart disease in the population studied and α - haemolytic Streptococci as the commonest responsible microorganism.

AB - Aims: To dissect the clinical-microbiological profile of Infective endocarditis (IE) population and to determine the risk factors for IE related mortality. Methods: A cohort study was conducted using relevant data from clinical records of patients (≥12. years) with definite/possible IE from December 2007 to December 2013 and was analyzed using appropriate statistical tests. Results: In the cohort of 139 IE patients, mean age was 47.9. ±. 15.8. years, with male preponderance (68.3%). Rheumatic heart disease was the commonest (30.9%) underlying cardiac lesion followed by mitral valve prolapse with mitral regurgitation (23.7%), degenerative valvular disease (23%), congenital heart disease (15.8%) and prosthetic valves (3.6%). Vegetations were detected in 94.2% cases. Blood cultures were positive in 69.8% cases, commonest organism isolated was α - hemolytic streptococci (30.9%) followed by Enterococcus (12.9%) and methicillin sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (10.8%). Complications observed were congestive cardiac failure (31.2%), acute kidney injury (25.9%), stroke (21.6%), septic shock (16.5%), embolic phenomenon non-stroke (8.6%), atrial fibrillation (5%) and ring abscess (2.9%). Mortality rate was 17.3%. Congestive cardiac failure, increase in the peak leucocyte count and stroke were the independent predictors of mortality. Conclusions: This study reiterates the persistent dominance of rheumatic heart disease in the population studied and α - haemolytic Streptococci as the commonest responsible microorganism.

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