Combustion characteristics of diesel engine operating on jatropha oil methyl ester

Doddayaraganalu Amasegoda Dhananjaya, Chitrapady Visweswara Sudhir, Padmanbha Mohanan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Fuel crisis because of dramatic increase in vehicular population and environmental concerns have renewed interest of scientific community to look for alternative fuels of bio-origin such as vegetable oils. Vegetable oils can be produced from forests, vegetable oil crops, and oil bearing biomass materials. Non-edible vegetable oils such as jatropha oil, linseed oil, mahua oil, rice bran oil, karanji oil, etc., are potentially effective diesel substitute. Vegetable oils have reasonable energy content. Biodiesel can be used in its pure form or can be blended with diesel to form different blends. It can be used in diesel engines with very little or no engine modifications. This is because it has combustion characteristics similar to petroleum diesel. The current paper reports a study carried out to investigate the combustion, performance and emission characteristics of jatropha oil methyl ester and its blend B20 (80% petroleum diesel and 20% jatropha oil methyl ester) and diesel fuel on a single-cylinder, four-stroke, direct injections, water cooled diesel engine. This study gives the comparative measures of brake thermal efficiency, brake specific energy consumption, smoke opacity, HC, NOx, ignition delay, cylinder peak pressure, and peak heat release rates. The engine performance in terms of higher thermal efficiency and lower emissions of blend B20 fuel operation was observed and compared with jatropha oil methyl ester and petroleum diesel fuel for injection timing of 20° bTDC, 23° bTDC and 26° bTDC at injection opening pressure of 220 bar.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)965-977
Number of pages13
JournalThermal Science
Volume14
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 01-12-2010
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Diesel engines
Esters
Vegetable oils
Crude oil
Engine cylinders
Diesel fuels
Brakes
Bearings (structural)
Engines
Oils
Alternative fuels
Direct injection
Opacity
Biodiesel
Smoke
Crops
Ignition
Biomass
Energy utilization
Hot Temperature

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Renewable Energy, Sustainability and the Environment

Cite this

Dhananjaya, Doddayaraganalu Amasegoda ; Sudhir, Chitrapady Visweswara ; Mohanan, Padmanbha. / Combustion characteristics of diesel engine operating on jatropha oil methyl ester. In: Thermal Science. 2010 ; Vol. 14, No. 4. pp. 965-977.
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Combustion characteristics of diesel engine operating on jatropha oil methyl ester. / Dhananjaya, Doddayaraganalu Amasegoda; Sudhir, Chitrapady Visweswara; Mohanan, Padmanbha.

In: Thermal Science, Vol. 14, No. 4, 01.12.2010, p. 965-977.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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