Comparative evaluation of wound healing potential of manuka and acacia honey in diabetic and nondiabetic rats

Rupam Gill, Basavaraj Poojar, Laxminarayana K. Bairy, Kumar S.E. Praveen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Manuka honey has attracted the attention of the scientific community for its antimicrobial and antioxidant properties. The active compounds of manuka honey to which its myeloperoxidase activity inhibition is owed are methyl syringate (MSYR) and leptosin (a novel glycoside of MSYR). The non-peroxide antibacterial activity is attributed to glyoxal, 3-deoxyglucosulose, and methylglyoxal. These properties make it an inexpensive and effective topical treatment in wound management. This study has focused on the evaluation of the effect of manuka honey and acacia honey on wound healing in nondiabetic and streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. Materials and Methods: This study was conducted on a total of 42 rats (six rats in each group) and respective drug/substance was topically applied once daily on the excision wound for 21 days. Induction of diabetes was carried out in rats in groups IV, V, VI, and VII only. Measurement of wound contraction was carried out on days 3, 6, 9, 12, 15, 18, and 21 after operation. Time taken for the complete epithelization was recorded along with a histopathological examination of the healed wound bed. Results: Topical application of manuka honey achieved ≥80% wound contraction on day 9 after operation in both the nondiabetic and diabetic group. Complete epithelization was achieved 2 days earlier than the normal epithelization time in the manuka group. Histopathological examination showed well-formed keratinized squamous epithelium with normal collagen tissue surrounding hair follicles. Conclusion: This study provides good outcome with respect to wound healing (especially in diabetic condition) when manuka honey was compared to acacia honey and standard treatment.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)116-126
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Pharmacy and Bioallied Sciences
Volume11
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 01-04-2019
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Acacia
Honey
Wound Healing
Rats
Wounds and Injuries
Glyoxal
Pyruvaldehyde
Glycosides
Streptozocin
Medical problems
Antioxidants
Collagen
Peroxidase
Tissue
Hair Follicle
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Epithelium
methyl syringate

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Bioengineering
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutics(all)

Cite this

Gill, Rupam ; Poojar, Basavaraj ; Bairy, Laxminarayana K. ; Praveen, Kumar S.E. / Comparative evaluation of wound healing potential of manuka and acacia honey in diabetic and nondiabetic rats. In: Journal of Pharmacy and Bioallied Sciences. 2019 ; Vol. 11, No. 2. pp. 116-126.
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Comparative evaluation of wound healing potential of manuka and acacia honey in diabetic and nondiabetic rats. / Gill, Rupam; Poojar, Basavaraj; Bairy, Laxminarayana K.; Praveen, Kumar S.E.

In: Journal of Pharmacy and Bioallied Sciences, Vol. 11, No. 2, 01.04.2019, p. 116-126.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Gill, Rupam

AU - Poojar, Basavaraj

AU - Bairy, Laxminarayana K.

AU - Praveen, Kumar S.E.

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