COVID-19: Emergence, Spread, Possible Treatments, and Global Burden

Raghuvir Keni, Anila Alexander, Pawan Ganesh Nayak, Jayesh Mudgal, Krishnadas Nandakumar

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The Coronavirus (CoV) is a large family of viruses known to cause illnesses ranging from the common cold to acute respiratory tract infection. The severity of the infection may be visible as pneumonia, acute respiratory syndrome, and even death. Until the outbreak of SARS, this group of viruses was greatly overlooked. However, since the SARS and MERS outbreaks, these viruses have been studied in greater detail, propelling the vaccine research. On December 31, 2019, mysterious cases of pneumonia were detected in the city of Wuhan in China's Hubei Province. On January 7, 2020, the causative agent was identified as a new coronavirus (2019-nCoV), and the disease was later named as COVID-19 by the WHO. The virus spread extensively in the Wuhan region of China and has gained entry to over 210 countries and territories. Though experts suspected that the virus is transmitted from animals to humans, there are mixed reports on the origin of the virus. There are no treatment options available for the virus as such, limited to the use of anti-HIV drugs and/or other antivirals such as Remdesivir and Galidesivir. For the containment of the virus, it is recommended to quarantine the infected and to follow good hygiene practices. The virus has had a significant socio-economic impact globally. Economically, China is likely to experience a greater setback than other countries from the pandemic due to added trade war pressure, which have been discussed in this paper.

Original languageEnglish
Article number216
JournalFrontiers in Public Health
Volume8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 28-05-2020

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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