Deposition and alignment of cells on laser-patterned quartz

Sajan D. George, Uma Ladiwala, John Thomas, Aseefhali Bankapur, Santhosh Chidangil, Deepak Mathur

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Linear grooves have been laser-written on quartz surfaces using ultrashort (50 fs) pulses of 800 nm light. Measurements of water contact angle indicate that laser patterning makes the quartz surface more hydrophilic. Fibroblast cells were cultured on such laser-written surfaces; they were observed to align preferentially along the direction of the laser written grooves (width ∼2 μm. Raman spectroscopy results indicate that there are no chemical changes induced in the surface upon our laser writing. Most unexpectedly, there are also no chemical changes induced in the cells that are spatially aligned along the laser-written grooves. Atomic force microscopy measurements confirm that our laser-writing induces dramatic enhancement of surface roughness along the grooves, and the cells appear to respond to this. Thus, cell alignment seems to be in response to physical cues rather than chemical signals.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)375-381
Number of pages7
JournalApplied Surface Science
Volume305
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 30-06-2014

Fingerprint

Quartz
Lasers
Fibroblasts
Contact angle
Raman spectroscopy
Atomic force microscopy
Surface roughness
Cells
Water

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Surfaces, Coatings and Films

Cite this

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abstract = "Linear grooves have been laser-written on quartz surfaces using ultrashort (50 fs) pulses of 800 nm light. Measurements of water contact angle indicate that laser patterning makes the quartz surface more hydrophilic. Fibroblast cells were cultured on such laser-written surfaces; they were observed to align preferentially along the direction of the laser written grooves (width ∼2 μm. Raman spectroscopy results indicate that there are no chemical changes induced in the surface upon our laser writing. Most unexpectedly, there are also no chemical changes induced in the cells that are spatially aligned along the laser-written grooves. Atomic force microscopy measurements confirm that our laser-writing induces dramatic enhancement of surface roughness along the grooves, and the cells appear to respond to this. Thus, cell alignment seems to be in response to physical cues rather than chemical signals.",
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Deposition and alignment of cells on laser-patterned quartz. / George, Sajan D.; Ladiwala, Uma; Thomas, John; Bankapur, Aseefhali; Chidangil, Santhosh; Mathur, Deepak.

In: Applied Surface Science, Vol. 305, 30.06.2014, p. 375-381.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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T1 - Deposition and alignment of cells on laser-patterned quartz

AU - George, Sajan D.

AU - Ladiwala, Uma

AU - Thomas, John

AU - Bankapur, Aseefhali

AU - Chidangil, Santhosh

AU - Mathur, Deepak

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