Direct-acting antiviral drugs against hepatitis C virus in renal transplant recipients: Is it the dawn of an interferon-free Era?

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a significant problem among hemodialysis population, especially in India where renal transplant often gets delayed in the presence of live-related donors. An acceleration of liver cirrhosis and poor renal allograft outcomes are often witnessed in allograft recipients with high viral load. Use of interferon in the postrenal transplant setting for the treatment of hepatitis C viral infection was limited to a few grave situations, fearing the precipitation of allograft rejection and poor efficacy for sustained virological remission. However, the availability of newer direct-acting antivirals has opened a new tool box in the management of HCV in the postrenal transplant setting and in reducing the pretransplant waiting period.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1169-1174
Number of pages6
JournalSaudi journal of kidney diseases and transplantation : an official publication of the Saudi Center for Organ Transplantation, Saudi Arabia
Volume28
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 01-09-2017

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Hepacivirus
Interferons
Antiviral Agents
Allografts
Transplants
Kidney
Virus Diseases
Hepatitis C
Viral Load
Liver Cirrhosis
Renal Dialysis
India
Tissue Donors
Population
Transplant Recipients
Therapeutics

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

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title = "Direct-acting antiviral drugs against hepatitis C virus in renal transplant recipients: Is it the dawn of an interferon-free Era?",
abstract = "Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a significant problem among hemodialysis population, especially in India where renal transplant often gets delayed in the presence of live-related donors. An acceleration of liver cirrhosis and poor renal allograft outcomes are often witnessed in allograft recipients with high viral load. Use of interferon in the postrenal transplant setting for the treatment of hepatitis C viral infection was limited to a few grave situations, fearing the precipitation of allograft rejection and poor efficacy for sustained virological remission. However, the availability of newer direct-acting antivirals has opened a new tool box in the management of HCV in the postrenal transplant setting and in reducing the pretransplant waiting period.",
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