Do residential care and low social capital negatively influence oral health-related quality of life (OHRQoL) among older adults? A cross-sectional study

Deeksha Karkada, Valerie Gloria D’Costa, Shashidhar Acharya

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objectives: To compare oral health status, OHRQoL and social capital between dependent older adults living in a residential care setting (RC) and community dwellers living independently (CD) and to assess the possible role of social capital and residential status as independent predictors of OHRQoL in a sample of older adults in the Udupi region of Karnataka, South India. Background: As the global population ages, a greater number of older adults are now living in residential care settings than ever before. This study provides insights into the role of residential care and social capital in influencing the oral health-related quality of life (OHRQoL) among older adults. Materials and Methods: A total of 296 older adults, comprising 148 dependent older adults living in residential care (RC) and 148 community dwelling older adults living independently (CD), completed the General Oral Health Assessment Index (GOHAI) and a Social Capital Scale after undergoing clinical oral examination for dentition and periodontal status. Results: The caries experience in both the residential care group (RC) and the community dwelling group (CD) was high with mean DMF scores of 21.6 (SD = 9.6) and 20.1 (SD = 10.7) respectively. The Mean Social Capital score was significantly higher (P =.01) among the RC group (33.2, SD = 5.1) than the CD group (31.5, SD = 5.7), whereas the mean GOHAI score was significantly higher (P =.02) among the CD (61.5, SD = 6.8) than the RC group (59.5, SD = 7.9). Linear regression showed lower DMFT scores (β: −0.26, P ˂.001), being a community dweller (β: 0.14, P =.01) and having higher social capital (β: 0.11, P =.04) were associated with better OHRQoL (higher GOHAI scores) after adjusting for possible confounders. Conclusion: Dependent older adults living in residential care had higher social capital but poorer OHRQoL. Caries experience, residential status and social capital were independently associated with OHRQoL.

Original languageEnglish
JournalGerodontology
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 2021

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Dentistry(all)
  • Geriatrics and Gerontology

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