Does scapular morphology affect the integrity of the rotator cuff?

Vivek Pandey, Deepu Vijayan, Sandeep Tapashetti, Lipisha Agarwal, Asha Kamath, Kiran Acharya, Satish Maddukuri, W. Jaap Willems

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

28 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Current evidence suggests that distinct scapular morphologies may predispose patients to a rotator cuff tear. The objective of this longitudinal study was to evaluate the relationship between symptomatic degenerative cuff tears and different radiographic acromial characteristics, including acromion shape, indices (acromial index [AI], critical shoulder angle [CSA]), and acromial spur. Methods: We divided 166 patients into 3 groups matched for age and sex: group 1, degenerative full-thickness tear; group 2, partial thickness bursal tear; and group 3, normal cuff. Patients were evaluated with standard radiographs and ultrasonography. Results: The presence of an acromial spur was strongly associated with a full-thickness cuff tear (odds ratio, 3.5; P = .001). AI and CSA revealed a statistically significant difference between means of group 1 (P = .006) and group 3 (P < .001). There was no statistically significant difference in means of AI between groups 1 and 2 (P = .695) and between groups 2 and 3, with respect to AI (P = .071) and CSA (P = .125). Receiver operating characteristic curve revealed a higher area for CSA (0.70) than for AI (0.61). Stepwise logistic regression rejected AI as a cuff tear predictor but confirmed CSA and a spur to be stronger predictors of a full-thickness cuff tear. There was no association between the Bigliani acromial type and rotator cuff tear (P = .06). Conclusions: The presence of an acromion spur is strongly associated with full-thickness cuff tear. Higher AI and CSA are associated with a full-thickness tear but not with partial tears. The type of acromion is not related to cuff tear.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)413-421
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery
Volume25
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 01-03-2016

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Rotator Cuff
Tears
Acromion
Cetirizine
ROC Curve
Longitudinal Studies
Ultrasonography
Research Design
Age Groups
Logistic Models
Odds Ratio

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Surgery
  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine

Cite this

Pandey, Vivek ; Vijayan, Deepu ; Tapashetti, Sandeep ; Agarwal, Lipisha ; Kamath, Asha ; Acharya, Kiran ; Maddukuri, Satish ; Willems, W. Jaap. / Does scapular morphology affect the integrity of the rotator cuff?. In: Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery. 2016 ; Vol. 25, No. 3. pp. 413-421.
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Does scapular morphology affect the integrity of the rotator cuff? / Pandey, Vivek; Vijayan, Deepu; Tapashetti, Sandeep; Agarwal, Lipisha; Kamath, Asha; Acharya, Kiran; Maddukuri, Satish; Willems, W. Jaap.

In: Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery, Vol. 25, No. 3, 01.03.2016, p. 413-421.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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N2 - Background: Current evidence suggests that distinct scapular morphologies may predispose patients to a rotator cuff tear. The objective of this longitudinal study was to evaluate the relationship between symptomatic degenerative cuff tears and different radiographic acromial characteristics, including acromion shape, indices (acromial index [AI], critical shoulder angle [CSA]), and acromial spur. Methods: We divided 166 patients into 3 groups matched for age and sex: group 1, degenerative full-thickness tear; group 2, partial thickness bursal tear; and group 3, normal cuff. Patients were evaluated with standard radiographs and ultrasonography. Results: The presence of an acromial spur was strongly associated with a full-thickness cuff tear (odds ratio, 3.5; P = .001). AI and CSA revealed a statistically significant difference between means of group 1 (P = .006) and group 3 (P < .001). There was no statistically significant difference in means of AI between groups 1 and 2 (P = .695) and between groups 2 and 3, with respect to AI (P = .071) and CSA (P = .125). Receiver operating characteristic curve revealed a higher area for CSA (0.70) than for AI (0.61). Stepwise logistic regression rejected AI as a cuff tear predictor but confirmed CSA and a spur to be stronger predictors of a full-thickness cuff tear. There was no association between the Bigliani acromial type and rotator cuff tear (P = .06). Conclusions: The presence of an acromion spur is strongly associated with full-thickness cuff tear. Higher AI and CSA are associated with a full-thickness tear but not with partial tears. The type of acromion is not related to cuff tear.

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