Drug interaction related information sought from a hospital based drug information center

B. Jimmy, J. Jose, P.G.M. Rao

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Independent drug information (DI) centers provide health care professionals with information related to drugs for safe prescribing. Drug interaction is one among the various categories of DI queries received by DI centers. This study was aimed at assessing the nature of drug interaction related queries received by the DI center of a tertiary care hospital and evaluates the utility of the information provided. Drug interactions related queries received by the DI center for 18 months were evaluated. The DI forms were evaluated for various parameters such as the drug and drug class most commonly involved in the queries. Those DI queries in which there was a documented drug-drug interaction; the severity, documentation and onset of the drug interaction was also assessed. Out of the DI queries (n=980) received during the study period, 128 (13%) were related to drug interactions. Majority (97, 75.7%) of the queries were from the department of medicine and clinicians utilized the service to an enormous extend (108, 84.3%). A drug interaction which was documented in literature was observed only in 40 (32%) queries which constituted 59 potential drug interactions. Fifty two percent of these interactions had good documentation in literature and 57.8% of these were of moderate severity as per literature. Majority (51, 86.4%) of these drug interactions have a delayed onset as per literature. Warfarin (18, 4.6%) was the drug and antimycobacterials was the drugs class most commonly involved (48, 12.2%) in the queries. Our study data revealed that information on drug interactions is one amongst the frequently sought drug related aspect by the health care professionals. Queries are most frequently asked for agents with wider interaction potential, even those which are well established and widely used which and those for which prescribers are less familiar with interaction potential. © 2007 - IOS Press and the authors. All rights reserved.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)127-133
Number of pages7
JournalInternational Journal of Risk and Safety in Medicine
Volume19
Issue number3
Publication statusPublished - 2007

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Information Centers
Drug Interactions
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Documentation
Delivery of Health Care
Drug Prescriptions
Warfarin
Tertiary Healthcare
Tertiary Care Centers

Cite this

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title = "Drug interaction related information sought from a hospital based drug information center",
abstract = "Independent drug information (DI) centers provide health care professionals with information related to drugs for safe prescribing. Drug interaction is one among the various categories of DI queries received by DI centers. This study was aimed at assessing the nature of drug interaction related queries received by the DI center of a tertiary care hospital and evaluates the utility of the information provided. Drug interactions related queries received by the DI center for 18 months were evaluated. The DI forms were evaluated for various parameters such as the drug and drug class most commonly involved in the queries. Those DI queries in which there was a documented drug-drug interaction; the severity, documentation and onset of the drug interaction was also assessed. Out of the DI queries (n=980) received during the study period, 128 (13{\%}) were related to drug interactions. Majority (97, 75.7{\%}) of the queries were from the department of medicine and clinicians utilized the service to an enormous extend (108, 84.3{\%}). A drug interaction which was documented in literature was observed only in 40 (32{\%}) queries which constituted 59 potential drug interactions. Fifty two percent of these interactions had good documentation in literature and 57.8{\%} of these were of moderate severity as per literature. Majority (51, 86.4{\%}) of these drug interactions have a delayed onset as per literature. Warfarin (18, 4.6{\%}) was the drug and antimycobacterials was the drugs class most commonly involved (48, 12.2{\%}) in the queries. Our study data revealed that information on drug interactions is one amongst the frequently sought drug related aspect by the health care professionals. Queries are most frequently asked for agents with wider interaction potential, even those which are well established and widely used which and those for which prescribers are less familiar with interaction potential. {\circledC} 2007 - IOS Press and the authors. All rights reserved.",
author = "B. Jimmy and J. Jose and P.G.M. Rao",
note = "Export Date: 10 November 2017 CODEN: IJMDE Correspondence Address: Jose, J.; Department of Pharmacy Practice, Shirdi Sai Baba Cancer Hospital, Kasturba Hospital, Manipal, Karnataka, 576 104, India; email: jimmy_jose2001@yahoo.com Chemicals/CAS: atorvastatin, 134523-00-5, 134523-03-8; carbamazepine, 298-46-4, 8047-84-5; digoxin, 20830-75-5, 57285-89-9; ethambutol, 10054-05-4, 1070-11-7, 3577-94-4, 74-55-5; fluconazole, 86386-73-4; isoniazid, 54-85-3, 62229-51-0, 65979-32-0; lamivudine, 134678-17-4, 134680-32-3; levofloxacin, 100986-85-4, 138199-71-0; metformin, 1115-70-4, 657-24-9; nevirapine, 129618-40-2; pantoprazole, 102625-70-7; phenytoin, 57-41-0, 630-93-3; pyrazinamide, 98-96-4; rifampicin, 13292-46-1; stavudine, 3056-17-5; theophylline, 58-55-9, 5967-84-0, 8055-07-0, 8061-56-1, 99007-19-9; valproic acid, 1069-66-5, 99-66-1; warfarin, 129-06-6, 2610-86-8, 3324-63-8, 5543-58-8, 81-81-2; zidovudine, 30516-87-1 References: Anastasio, G.D., Cornell, K.O., Menscer, D., Drug interactions: Keeping it straight (1997) American Family Physician, 56, pp. 883-888; Babington, M.A., Robinson, L.A., Monson, R.A., Requests for drug information in a university hospital medical clinic (1982) American Journal of Hospital Pharmacy, 39, pp. 127-128; Boston Collaborative Surveillance Program, Adverse drug interactions, The Journal of the American Medical Association 220 (1972), 1238-1239; Chen, Y.F., Avery, A.J., Neil, K.E., Johnson, C., Dewey, M.E., Stockley, I.H., Incidence and possible causes of prescribing potentially hazardous/contraindicated drug combinations in general practice (2005) Drug Safety, 28, pp. 67-80; George, B., Rao, P.G.M., Assessment and evaluation of drug information services provided in a South Indian teaching hospital (2005) Indian Journal of Pharmacology, 37, pp. 315-318; Gilroy, G.W., Scollins, M.J., Gay, C.A., Harry, D.J., Ginnuzzi, D.F., Pharmacy-coordinated program that encourages physician reporting of adverse drug reactions (1990) American Journal of Hospital Pharmacy, 47, pp. 1327-1333; Hamilton, R.A., Briceland, L.L., Andritz, M.H., Frequency of hospitalization after exposure to known drug-drug interactions in Medicaid population (1998) Pharmacotherapy, 18, pp. 1112-1120; Jose, J., Rao, P.G.M., Pattern of adverse drug reactions notified by spontaneous reporting in an Indian tertiary care teaching hospital (2005) Pharmacological Research, 54, pp. 226-233; Joshi, M.P., Drug information service at teaching hospitals in developing countries (1998) Indian Journal of Pharmacology, 30, pp. 1-5; DRUG-REAX{\circledR} System, Thomson Micromedex, Greenwood Village, , R.K. Klasco ed, CO, Edition expires June 2007; Lakshmi, P.K., Gundu Rao, D.A., Gore, S.B., Bhaskaran, S., Drug Information Services to doctors of Karnataka, India (2003) Indian Journal of Pharmacology, 35, pp. 245-247; Leape, L.L., Bates, D.W., Cullen, D.J., Cooper, J., Demonaco, H.J., Gallivan, T., Systems analysis of adverse drug events: ADE prevention study group (1995) Journal of American Medical Association, 274, pp. 35-43; May, F.E., Stewart, R.B., Cluff, L.E., Drug interactions and multiple drug administration (1977) Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics, 22, pp. 322-328; McDonnel, P.J., Jacobs, M.R., Hospital admissions resulting from preventable adverse drug reactions (2002) The Annals of Pharmacotherapy, 36, pp. 1331-1336; Nibu, P., Ramesh, M., Parthasarathi, G., Review of a drug information service in an Indian teaching hospital (2001) The Australian Journal of Hospital Pharmacy, 31, pp. 144-145; Prince, B.S., Goetz, C.M., Rihn, T.L., Olsky, Drug related emergency department visits and hospital admissions (1992) American Journal of Hospital Pharmacy, 49, pp. 1696-1700; Rao, P.G.M., Gore, S., Survey and evaluation of the Drug Information Services in Kasturba Hospital, Manipal (2004) Indian Journal of Pharmaceutical Education, 38, pp. 150-153; Raschetti, R., Morgutti, M., Menniti-Ippolito, F., Belisari, A., Rossignoli, A., Longhini, P., Suspected adverse drug events requiring emergency department visits or hospital admissions (1999) European Journal of Clinical Pharmacology, 54, pp. 959-963; Shad, M.U., Marsh, C., Preskom, S.H., The economic consequences of a drug-drug interaction (2001) Journal of Clinical Psychopharmacology, 21, pp. 119-120; (2002) Stockley's Drug Interactions, , I.H. Stockley ed, 6th edn, Pharmaceutical Press, London; Triplitt, C., Drug interactions of medications commonly used in diabetes (2006) Diabetes Spectrum, 19, pp. 202-211; (2006) Completed ATC, , http://www.whocc.no/atcddd, WHO Collaborating Centre for Drug Statistics Methodology, Index",
year = "2007",
language = "English",
volume = "19",
pages = "127--133",
journal = "International Journal of Risk and Safety in Medicine",
issn = "0924-6479",
publisher = "IOS Press",
number = "3",

}

Drug interaction related information sought from a hospital based drug information center. / Jimmy, B.; Jose, J.; Rao, P.G.M.

In: International Journal of Risk and Safety in Medicine, Vol. 19, No. 3, 2007, p. 127-133.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Drug interaction related information sought from a hospital based drug information center

AU - Jimmy, B.

AU - Jose, J.

AU - Rao, P.G.M.

N1 - Export Date: 10 November 2017 CODEN: IJMDE Correspondence Address: Jose, J.; Department of Pharmacy Practice, Shirdi Sai Baba Cancer Hospital, Kasturba Hospital, Manipal, Karnataka, 576 104, India; email: jimmy_jose2001@yahoo.com Chemicals/CAS: atorvastatin, 134523-00-5, 134523-03-8; carbamazepine, 298-46-4, 8047-84-5; digoxin, 20830-75-5, 57285-89-9; ethambutol, 10054-05-4, 1070-11-7, 3577-94-4, 74-55-5; fluconazole, 86386-73-4; isoniazid, 54-85-3, 62229-51-0, 65979-32-0; lamivudine, 134678-17-4, 134680-32-3; levofloxacin, 100986-85-4, 138199-71-0; metformin, 1115-70-4, 657-24-9; nevirapine, 129618-40-2; pantoprazole, 102625-70-7; phenytoin, 57-41-0, 630-93-3; pyrazinamide, 98-96-4; rifampicin, 13292-46-1; stavudine, 3056-17-5; theophylline, 58-55-9, 5967-84-0, 8055-07-0, 8061-56-1, 99007-19-9; valproic acid, 1069-66-5, 99-66-1; warfarin, 129-06-6, 2610-86-8, 3324-63-8, 5543-58-8, 81-81-2; zidovudine, 30516-87-1 References: Anastasio, G.D., Cornell, K.O., Menscer, D., Drug interactions: Keeping it straight (1997) American Family Physician, 56, pp. 883-888; Babington, M.A., Robinson, L.A., Monson, R.A., Requests for drug information in a university hospital medical clinic (1982) American Journal of Hospital Pharmacy, 39, pp. 127-128; Boston Collaborative Surveillance Program, Adverse drug interactions, The Journal of the American Medical Association 220 (1972), 1238-1239; Chen, Y.F., Avery, A.J., Neil, K.E., Johnson, C., Dewey, M.E., Stockley, I.H., Incidence and possible causes of prescribing potentially hazardous/contraindicated drug combinations in general practice (2005) Drug Safety, 28, pp. 67-80; George, B., Rao, P.G.M., Assessment and evaluation of drug information services provided in a South Indian teaching hospital (2005) Indian Journal of Pharmacology, 37, pp. 315-318; Gilroy, G.W., Scollins, M.J., Gay, C.A., Harry, D.J., Ginnuzzi, D.F., Pharmacy-coordinated program that encourages physician reporting of adverse drug reactions (1990) American Journal of Hospital Pharmacy, 47, pp. 1327-1333; Hamilton, R.A., Briceland, L.L., Andritz, M.H., Frequency of hospitalization after exposure to known drug-drug interactions in Medicaid population (1998) Pharmacotherapy, 18, pp. 1112-1120; Jose, J., Rao, P.G.M., Pattern of adverse drug reactions notified by spontaneous reporting in an Indian tertiary care teaching hospital (2005) Pharmacological Research, 54, pp. 226-233; Joshi, M.P., Drug information service at teaching hospitals in developing countries (1998) Indian Journal of Pharmacology, 30, pp. 1-5; DRUG-REAX® System, Thomson Micromedex, Greenwood Village, , R.K. Klasco ed, CO, Edition expires June 2007; Lakshmi, P.K., Gundu Rao, D.A., Gore, S.B., Bhaskaran, S., Drug Information Services to doctors of Karnataka, India (2003) Indian Journal of Pharmacology, 35, pp. 245-247; Leape, L.L., Bates, D.W., Cullen, D.J., Cooper, J., Demonaco, H.J., Gallivan, T., Systems analysis of adverse drug events: ADE prevention study group (1995) Journal of American Medical Association, 274, pp. 35-43; May, F.E., Stewart, R.B., Cluff, L.E., Drug interactions and multiple drug administration (1977) Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics, 22, pp. 322-328; McDonnel, P.J., Jacobs, M.R., Hospital admissions resulting from preventable adverse drug reactions (2002) The Annals of Pharmacotherapy, 36, pp. 1331-1336; Nibu, P., Ramesh, M., Parthasarathi, G., Review of a drug information service in an Indian teaching hospital (2001) The Australian Journal of Hospital Pharmacy, 31, pp. 144-145; Prince, B.S., Goetz, C.M., Rihn, T.L., Olsky, Drug related emergency department visits and hospital admissions (1992) American Journal of Hospital Pharmacy, 49, pp. 1696-1700; Rao, P.G.M., Gore, S., Survey and evaluation of the Drug Information Services in Kasturba Hospital, Manipal (2004) Indian Journal of Pharmaceutical Education, 38, pp. 150-153; Raschetti, R., Morgutti, M., Menniti-Ippolito, F., Belisari, A., Rossignoli, A., Longhini, P., Suspected adverse drug events requiring emergency department visits or hospital admissions (1999) European Journal of Clinical Pharmacology, 54, pp. 959-963; Shad, M.U., Marsh, C., Preskom, S.H., The economic consequences of a drug-drug interaction (2001) Journal of Clinical Psychopharmacology, 21, pp. 119-120; (2002) Stockley's Drug Interactions, , I.H. Stockley ed, 6th edn, Pharmaceutical Press, London; Triplitt, C., Drug interactions of medications commonly used in diabetes (2006) Diabetes Spectrum, 19, pp. 202-211; (2006) Completed ATC, , http://www.whocc.no/atcddd, WHO Collaborating Centre for Drug Statistics Methodology, Index

PY - 2007

Y1 - 2007

N2 - Independent drug information (DI) centers provide health care professionals with information related to drugs for safe prescribing. Drug interaction is one among the various categories of DI queries received by DI centers. This study was aimed at assessing the nature of drug interaction related queries received by the DI center of a tertiary care hospital and evaluates the utility of the information provided. Drug interactions related queries received by the DI center for 18 months were evaluated. The DI forms were evaluated for various parameters such as the drug and drug class most commonly involved in the queries. Those DI queries in which there was a documented drug-drug interaction; the severity, documentation and onset of the drug interaction was also assessed. Out of the DI queries (n=980) received during the study period, 128 (13%) were related to drug interactions. Majority (97, 75.7%) of the queries were from the department of medicine and clinicians utilized the service to an enormous extend (108, 84.3%). A drug interaction which was documented in literature was observed only in 40 (32%) queries which constituted 59 potential drug interactions. Fifty two percent of these interactions had good documentation in literature and 57.8% of these were of moderate severity as per literature. Majority (51, 86.4%) of these drug interactions have a delayed onset as per literature. Warfarin (18, 4.6%) was the drug and antimycobacterials was the drugs class most commonly involved (48, 12.2%) in the queries. Our study data revealed that information on drug interactions is one amongst the frequently sought drug related aspect by the health care professionals. Queries are most frequently asked for agents with wider interaction potential, even those which are well established and widely used which and those for which prescribers are less familiar with interaction potential. © 2007 - IOS Press and the authors. All rights reserved.

AB - Independent drug information (DI) centers provide health care professionals with information related to drugs for safe prescribing. Drug interaction is one among the various categories of DI queries received by DI centers. This study was aimed at assessing the nature of drug interaction related queries received by the DI center of a tertiary care hospital and evaluates the utility of the information provided. Drug interactions related queries received by the DI center for 18 months were evaluated. The DI forms were evaluated for various parameters such as the drug and drug class most commonly involved in the queries. Those DI queries in which there was a documented drug-drug interaction; the severity, documentation and onset of the drug interaction was also assessed. Out of the DI queries (n=980) received during the study period, 128 (13%) were related to drug interactions. Majority (97, 75.7%) of the queries were from the department of medicine and clinicians utilized the service to an enormous extend (108, 84.3%). A drug interaction which was documented in literature was observed only in 40 (32%) queries which constituted 59 potential drug interactions. Fifty two percent of these interactions had good documentation in literature and 57.8% of these were of moderate severity as per literature. Majority (51, 86.4%) of these drug interactions have a delayed onset as per literature. Warfarin (18, 4.6%) was the drug and antimycobacterials was the drugs class most commonly involved (48, 12.2%) in the queries. Our study data revealed that information on drug interactions is one amongst the frequently sought drug related aspect by the health care professionals. Queries are most frequently asked for agents with wider interaction potential, even those which are well established and widely used which and those for which prescribers are less familiar with interaction potential. © 2007 - IOS Press and the authors. All rights reserved.

M3 - Article

VL - 19

SP - 127

EP - 133

JO - International Journal of Risk and Safety in Medicine

JF - International Journal of Risk and Safety in Medicine

SN - 0924-6479

IS - 3

ER -