Effect of aquatic therapy on balance and gait in stroke survivors: A systematic review and meta-analysis

Pradeepa Nayak, Amreen Mahmood, Manikandan Natarajan, Aditi Hombali, C. G. Prashanth, John M. Solomon

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Abstract

Background: The evidence on aquatic therapy (AT) for improving balance and gait deficits post-stroke is unclear. Therefore, this study aimed to determine the effect of AT on balance and gait in stroke survivors. Methods: We searched CINAHL, PubMed, Web of Science, Aqua4balance, Ewac, Cochrane, and EMBASE databases from inception to 1st November 2019. Results: Eleven studies with 455 participants were included for the review. Meta-analysis showed that AT was effective for improving balance (MD 3.23, 95% CI 1.06, 5.39; p = 0.004; I2 = 61%) and gait speed (MD 0.77, 95% CI 0.25, 1.29; p = 0.004; I2 = 0%) when delivered alone. AT was effective in improving cadence (MD 4.41, 95% CI 0.82, 8.00; p = 0.02; I2 = 68%) when delivered as an adjunct to land-based therapy. Conclusion: AT may be used to improve balance and gait after stroke; however, the evidence to support its use is still low.

Original languageEnglish
Article number101110
JournalComplementary Therapies in Clinical Practice
Volume39
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 05-2020

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Gait
Meta-Analysis
Stroke
Therapeutics
PubMed
Databases

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Complementary and alternative medicine

Cite this

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title = "Effect of aquatic therapy on balance and gait in stroke survivors: A systematic review and meta-analysis",
abstract = "Background: The evidence on aquatic therapy (AT) for improving balance and gait deficits post-stroke is unclear. Therefore, this study aimed to determine the effect of AT on balance and gait in stroke survivors. Methods: We searched CINAHL, PubMed, Web of Science, Aqua4balance, Ewac, Cochrane, and EMBASE databases from inception to 1st November 2019. Results: Eleven studies with 455 participants were included for the review. Meta-analysis showed that AT was effective for improving balance (MD 3.23, 95{\%} CI 1.06, 5.39; p = 0.004; I2 = 61{\%}) and gait speed (MD 0.77, 95{\%} CI 0.25, 1.29; p = 0.004; I2 = 0{\%}) when delivered alone. AT was effective in improving cadence (MD 4.41, 95{\%} CI 0.82, 8.00; p = 0.02; I2 = 68{\%}) when delivered as an adjunct to land-based therapy. Conclusion: AT may be used to improve balance and gait after stroke; however, the evidence to support its use is still low.",
author = "Pradeepa Nayak and Amreen Mahmood and Manikandan Natarajan and Aditi Hombali and Prashanth, {C. G.} and Solomon, {John M.}",
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Effect of aquatic therapy on balance and gait in stroke survivors : A systematic review and meta-analysis. / Nayak, Pradeepa; Mahmood, Amreen; Natarajan, Manikandan; Hombali, Aditi; Prashanth, C. G.; Solomon, John M.

In: Complementary Therapies in Clinical Practice, Vol. 39, 101110, 05.2020.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

TY - JOUR

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T2 - A systematic review and meta-analysis

AU - Nayak, Pradeepa

AU - Mahmood, Amreen

AU - Natarajan, Manikandan

AU - Hombali, Aditi

AU - Prashanth, C. G.

AU - Solomon, John M.

PY - 2020/5

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N2 - Background: The evidence on aquatic therapy (AT) for improving balance and gait deficits post-stroke is unclear. Therefore, this study aimed to determine the effect of AT on balance and gait in stroke survivors. Methods: We searched CINAHL, PubMed, Web of Science, Aqua4balance, Ewac, Cochrane, and EMBASE databases from inception to 1st November 2019. Results: Eleven studies with 455 participants were included for the review. Meta-analysis showed that AT was effective for improving balance (MD 3.23, 95% CI 1.06, 5.39; p = 0.004; I2 = 61%) and gait speed (MD 0.77, 95% CI 0.25, 1.29; p = 0.004; I2 = 0%) when delivered alone. AT was effective in improving cadence (MD 4.41, 95% CI 0.82, 8.00; p = 0.02; I2 = 68%) when delivered as an adjunct to land-based therapy. Conclusion: AT may be used to improve balance and gait after stroke; however, the evidence to support its use is still low.

AB - Background: The evidence on aquatic therapy (AT) for improving balance and gait deficits post-stroke is unclear. Therefore, this study aimed to determine the effect of AT on balance and gait in stroke survivors. Methods: We searched CINAHL, PubMed, Web of Science, Aqua4balance, Ewac, Cochrane, and EMBASE databases from inception to 1st November 2019. Results: Eleven studies with 455 participants were included for the review. Meta-analysis showed that AT was effective for improving balance (MD 3.23, 95% CI 1.06, 5.39; p = 0.004; I2 = 61%) and gait speed (MD 0.77, 95% CI 0.25, 1.29; p = 0.004; I2 = 0%) when delivered alone. AT was effective in improving cadence (MD 4.41, 95% CI 0.82, 8.00; p = 0.02; I2 = 68%) when delivered as an adjunct to land-based therapy. Conclusion: AT may be used to improve balance and gait after stroke; however, the evidence to support its use is still low.

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