Effect of curcumin on radiation-impaired healing of excisional wounds in mice.

G. C. Jagetia, G. K. Rajanikant

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

36 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To study the effect on wound contraction of pretreatment with various doses of curcumin (the most important active ingredient of the spice turmeric) in mice exposed to 6 Gy whole-body gamma radiation. METHOD: A full-thickness skin wound was produced on the dorsum of Swiss albino mice treated with and without 25, 50, 100, 150 or 200 mg/kg body weight of curcumin before exposure to 6 Gy gamma radiation. Progression of wound contraction was monitored using video images of the wound at various days post-irradiation until full healing occurred. Mean wound healing times were also calculated. RESULTS: Irradiation caused significant delay in wound contraction and healing times. However, treatment with curcumin resulted in a dose-dependent increase in contraction when compared with a control. Greatest contraction was observed for 100 mg/kg curcumin, with statistically significant results at days three (p < 0.009), six (p < 0.05) and nine (p < 0.05) post-irradiation for this dose. Complete healing was achieved by day 23 post-irradiation in the curcumin-treated irradiation group. CONCLUSION: Pretreatment with curcumin has a conductive effect on irradiated wounds. It could be a substantial therapeutic agent for ameliorating radiation-induced delay in wound repair in cases of combined injuries.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)107-109
Number of pages3
JournalJournal of wound care
Volume13
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 01-01-2004
Externally publishedYes

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Curcumin
Wound Healing
Radiation
Wounds and Injuries
Gamma Rays
Radiation Dosage
Curcuma
Spices
Whole-Body Irradiation
Body Weight
Skin
Therapeutics

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Fundamentals and skills
  • Nursing (miscellaneous)

Cite this

Jagetia, G. C. ; Rajanikant, G. K. / Effect of curcumin on radiation-impaired healing of excisional wounds in mice. In: Journal of wound care. 2004 ; Vol. 13, No. 3. pp. 107-109.
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Effect of curcumin on radiation-impaired healing of excisional wounds in mice. / Jagetia, G. C.; Rajanikant, G. K.

In: Journal of wound care, Vol. 13, No. 3, 01.01.2004, p. 107-109.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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