Effect of snuff on nasal mucosa

Suja Sreedharan, Mulki Panduranga Kamath, Urmila Khadilkar, Mahesh Chandra Hegde, Rajeev M. Kumar, Ravikumar Raju Mudunuri, Satish Chandra Tripuraneni

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: The inhalation of nasal snuff (powdered tobacco) is a common addiction in the Indian subcontinent. In the western world, there is a resurgence of interest in nasal snuff because it does have the morbidity associated with smoked tobacco. Very few studies have reported the long-term effects of snuff on nasal mucosa. The objective of the present study was to investigate the effect of long-term use of snuff on the nasal mucosa. Materials and methods: We conducted a retrospective study on 29 snuff users. We investigated the reasons for initiation of this particular form of addiction along with the clinical signs and symptoms of long-term snuff usage. At the time of the study, all patients complained of one or more nasal symptoms. Nasal obstruction and nasal discharge taken together were reported by 62.5% of patients. Gross mucosal edema of the septum and turbinates was the main finding on nasal examination. The absolute eosinophil count and total serum immunoglobulin E were elevated in 62.5% and 66.7% of patients, respectively. On skin prick test, 41% of patients reacted positively to snuff and 25% to tobacco. Histopathologic examination of the turbinates (16 patients) showed squamous metaplasia, capillary proliferation, capillary and venous dilatation, inflammatory cell reaction, subepithelial edema, and fibrosis. Conclusions: Much has been written about the advantages of nasal snuff over products that deliver tobacco smoke. Our study shows that snuff users, after long-term abuse, develop a form of chronic rhinitis, as a consequence of which they develop blocked and stuffy noses. We conclude that nasal snuff is not a suitable substitute for smoked tobacco because it does not avoid ill health.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)151-156
Number of pages6
JournalAmerican Journal of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Medicine and Surgery
Volume26
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 01-01-2005

Fingerprint

Smokeless Tobacco
Nasal Mucosa
Nose
Tobacco
Turbinates
Edema
Western World
Nasal Obstruction
Time and Motion Studies
Metaplasia
Rhinitis
Skin Tests
Eosinophils
Smoke
Tobacco Products
Immunoglobulin E
Inhalation
Signs and Symptoms
Dilatation
Fibrosis

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Otorhinolaryngology

Cite this

Sreedharan, Suja ; Kamath, Mulki Panduranga ; Khadilkar, Urmila ; Hegde, Mahesh Chandra ; Kumar, Rajeev M. ; Mudunuri, Ravikumar Raju ; Tripuraneni, Satish Chandra. / Effect of snuff on nasal mucosa. In: American Journal of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Medicine and Surgery. 2005 ; Vol. 26, No. 3. pp. 151-156.
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Effect of snuff on nasal mucosa. / Sreedharan, Suja; Kamath, Mulki Panduranga; Khadilkar, Urmila; Hegde, Mahesh Chandra; Kumar, Rajeev M.; Mudunuri, Ravikumar Raju; Tripuraneni, Satish Chandra.

In: American Journal of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Medicine and Surgery, Vol. 26, No. 3, 01.01.2005, p. 151-156.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Kamath, Mulki Panduranga

AU - Khadilkar, Urmila

AU - Hegde, Mahesh Chandra

AU - Kumar, Rajeev M.

AU - Mudunuri, Ravikumar Raju

AU - Tripuraneni, Satish Chandra

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N2 - Purpose: The inhalation of nasal snuff (powdered tobacco) is a common addiction in the Indian subcontinent. In the western world, there is a resurgence of interest in nasal snuff because it does have the morbidity associated with smoked tobacco. Very few studies have reported the long-term effects of snuff on nasal mucosa. The objective of the present study was to investigate the effect of long-term use of snuff on the nasal mucosa. Materials and methods: We conducted a retrospective study on 29 snuff users. We investigated the reasons for initiation of this particular form of addiction along with the clinical signs and symptoms of long-term snuff usage. At the time of the study, all patients complained of one or more nasal symptoms. Nasal obstruction and nasal discharge taken together were reported by 62.5% of patients. Gross mucosal edema of the septum and turbinates was the main finding on nasal examination. The absolute eosinophil count and total serum immunoglobulin E were elevated in 62.5% and 66.7% of patients, respectively. On skin prick test, 41% of patients reacted positively to snuff and 25% to tobacco. Histopathologic examination of the turbinates (16 patients) showed squamous metaplasia, capillary proliferation, capillary and venous dilatation, inflammatory cell reaction, subepithelial edema, and fibrosis. Conclusions: Much has been written about the advantages of nasal snuff over products that deliver tobacco smoke. Our study shows that snuff users, after long-term abuse, develop a form of chronic rhinitis, as a consequence of which they develop blocked and stuffy noses. We conclude that nasal snuff is not a suitable substitute for smoked tobacco because it does not avoid ill health.

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