Effects of perceived stress, mindfulness, self-efficacy and social support on psychological wellbeing of life insurance agents during the COVID-19 pandemic

Tantri Keerthi Dinesh, Ankitha Shetty, Mathew Thomas Gil, Komal Jenifer D’souza

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The Conservation of Resources theory has been set in motion to understand the psychological wellbeing at work-place-focused foothold of the realm in light of the JD-R theory. Life insurance agents experience multifarious stressors and challenges that negatively impact their psychological wellbeing. The current pandemic situation of the COVID-19 outbreak has directed significance to workplace health promotion as a novel postulation addressed in this study. This research is the first to empirically test and investigate the predicting effects of perceived stress, mindfulness, social support, and self-efficacy on psychological well-being among 794 Life Insurance Agents in India. This non-experimental research method incorporates the reflective model analysed through Smart PLS-3. A power analysis is executed by drawing evidence from India recruited through random sampling. Results show mindfulness as the strongest and most effective predictor of positive psychological well-being. This study underpins the significance of mindfulness-based interventions in unprecedented times during the COVID-19 pandemic where the mindful selling of the right policies surges and assists the agents to build a long-term relationship with the customers. Future studies should try to test these interventions with multi-centred research that can further enhance the robustness of research findings.

Original languageEnglish
JournalEconomic Research-Ekonomska Istrazivanja
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 2022

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Economics and Econometrics

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Effects of perceived stress, mindfulness, self-efficacy and social support on psychological wellbeing of life insurance agents during the COVID-19 pandemic'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this