Efficacy of Trunk Regimes on Balance, Mobility, Physical Function, and Community Reintegration in Chronic Stroke

A Parallel-Group Randomized Trial

Suruliraj Karthikbabu, Mahabala Chakrapani, Sailakshmi Ganesan, Ratnavalli Ellajosyula, John M. Solomon

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: The study objective was to examine the efficacy of plinth and Swiss ball-based trunk exercise regimes on balance, mobility, physical function, and community reintegration compared with standard physiotherapy in chronic stroke. Subjects and Methods: This observer-blinded parallel-group randomized trial was conducted in outpatient stroke units. People with chronic stroke aged between 30 and 75 years, first onset of unilateral cortical lesion, poor trunk performance, 10 m independent walking ability with or without walking aids, and absence of pusher syndrome were included. Trunk Impairment Scale 2.0, Brunel Balance Assessment, Tinetti scale, gait speed, Stroke Impact Scale-16, and Reintegration to Normal Living Index were the measures. Experimental interventions involved the practice of selective upper and lower trunk movements using either plinth or Swiss ball. Control group received standard physiotherapy. All the patients practiced 1 hour exercise session, 3 sessions a week over a duration of 6 weeks and followed up after 3 and 12 months. Results: Of 108 patients allocated into 3 groups, baseline characteristics were similar. Postintervention compared with control group, the plinth, and Swiss ball groups showed significant mean changes in the outcome measures: trunk impairment scale 2.0 (3.6;4.1 points), Brunel Balance Assessment (1-level), Tinetti scale (5;5.2 points), gait speed (.06;.08 m/s), Stroke Impact Scale-16 (8.7;7.2 points), and community reintegration (7.6;8.8 points). These improvements were retained during 3-12 months' follow-up. Statistical significant was set at P < .05. Conclusion: Plinth and Swiss ball-based trunk exercise regimes showed significant improvements in balance, mobility, physical function, and community reintegration in chronic stroke as against standard physiotherapy.

Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of Stroke and Cerebrovascular Diseases
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 01-01-2018

Fingerprint

Stroke
Exercise
Walking
Control Groups
Outpatients
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Walking Speed

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Surgery
  • Rehabilitation
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

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title = "Efficacy of Trunk Regimes on Balance, Mobility, Physical Function, and Community Reintegration in Chronic Stroke: A Parallel-Group Randomized Trial",
abstract = "Objective: The study objective was to examine the efficacy of plinth and Swiss ball-based trunk exercise regimes on balance, mobility, physical function, and community reintegration compared with standard physiotherapy in chronic stroke. Subjects and Methods: This observer-blinded parallel-group randomized trial was conducted in outpatient stroke units. People with chronic stroke aged between 30 and 75 years, first onset of unilateral cortical lesion, poor trunk performance, 10 m independent walking ability with or without walking aids, and absence of pusher syndrome were included. Trunk Impairment Scale 2.0, Brunel Balance Assessment, Tinetti scale, gait speed, Stroke Impact Scale-16, and Reintegration to Normal Living Index were the measures. Experimental interventions involved the practice of selective upper and lower trunk movements using either plinth or Swiss ball. Control group received standard physiotherapy. All the patients practiced 1 hour exercise session, 3 sessions a week over a duration of 6 weeks and followed up after 3 and 12 months. Results: Of 108 patients allocated into 3 groups, baseline characteristics were similar. Postintervention compared with control group, the plinth, and Swiss ball groups showed significant mean changes in the outcome measures: trunk impairment scale 2.0 (3.6;4.1 points), Brunel Balance Assessment (1-level), Tinetti scale (5;5.2 points), gait speed (.06;.08 m/s), Stroke Impact Scale-16 (8.7;7.2 points), and community reintegration (7.6;8.8 points). These improvements were retained during 3-12 months' follow-up. Statistical significant was set at P < .05. Conclusion: Plinth and Swiss ball-based trunk exercise regimes showed significant improvements in balance, mobility, physical function, and community reintegration in chronic stroke as against standard physiotherapy.",
author = "Suruliraj Karthikbabu and Mahabala Chakrapani and Sailakshmi Ganesan and Ratnavalli Ellajosyula and Solomon, {John M.}",
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T1 - Efficacy of Trunk Regimes on Balance, Mobility, Physical Function, and Community Reintegration in Chronic Stroke

T2 - A Parallel-Group Randomized Trial

AU - Karthikbabu, Suruliraj

AU - Chakrapani, Mahabala

AU - Ganesan, Sailakshmi

AU - Ellajosyula, Ratnavalli

AU - Solomon, John M.

PY - 2018/1/1

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N2 - Objective: The study objective was to examine the efficacy of plinth and Swiss ball-based trunk exercise regimes on balance, mobility, physical function, and community reintegration compared with standard physiotherapy in chronic stroke. Subjects and Methods: This observer-blinded parallel-group randomized trial was conducted in outpatient stroke units. People with chronic stroke aged between 30 and 75 years, first onset of unilateral cortical lesion, poor trunk performance, 10 m independent walking ability with or without walking aids, and absence of pusher syndrome were included. Trunk Impairment Scale 2.0, Brunel Balance Assessment, Tinetti scale, gait speed, Stroke Impact Scale-16, and Reintegration to Normal Living Index were the measures. Experimental interventions involved the practice of selective upper and lower trunk movements using either plinth or Swiss ball. Control group received standard physiotherapy. All the patients practiced 1 hour exercise session, 3 sessions a week over a duration of 6 weeks and followed up after 3 and 12 months. Results: Of 108 patients allocated into 3 groups, baseline characteristics were similar. Postintervention compared with control group, the plinth, and Swiss ball groups showed significant mean changes in the outcome measures: trunk impairment scale 2.0 (3.6;4.1 points), Brunel Balance Assessment (1-level), Tinetti scale (5;5.2 points), gait speed (.06;.08 m/s), Stroke Impact Scale-16 (8.7;7.2 points), and community reintegration (7.6;8.8 points). These improvements were retained during 3-12 months' follow-up. Statistical significant was set at P < .05. Conclusion: Plinth and Swiss ball-based trunk exercise regimes showed significant improvements in balance, mobility, physical function, and community reintegration in chronic stroke as against standard physiotherapy.

AB - Objective: The study objective was to examine the efficacy of plinth and Swiss ball-based trunk exercise regimes on balance, mobility, physical function, and community reintegration compared with standard physiotherapy in chronic stroke. Subjects and Methods: This observer-blinded parallel-group randomized trial was conducted in outpatient stroke units. People with chronic stroke aged between 30 and 75 years, first onset of unilateral cortical lesion, poor trunk performance, 10 m independent walking ability with or without walking aids, and absence of pusher syndrome were included. Trunk Impairment Scale 2.0, Brunel Balance Assessment, Tinetti scale, gait speed, Stroke Impact Scale-16, and Reintegration to Normal Living Index were the measures. Experimental interventions involved the practice of selective upper and lower trunk movements using either plinth or Swiss ball. Control group received standard physiotherapy. All the patients practiced 1 hour exercise session, 3 sessions a week over a duration of 6 weeks and followed up after 3 and 12 months. Results: Of 108 patients allocated into 3 groups, baseline characteristics were similar. Postintervention compared with control group, the plinth, and Swiss ball groups showed significant mean changes in the outcome measures: trunk impairment scale 2.0 (3.6;4.1 points), Brunel Balance Assessment (1-level), Tinetti scale (5;5.2 points), gait speed (.06;.08 m/s), Stroke Impact Scale-16 (8.7;7.2 points), and community reintegration (7.6;8.8 points). These improvements were retained during 3-12 months' follow-up. Statistical significant was set at P < .05. Conclusion: Plinth and Swiss ball-based trunk exercise regimes showed significant improvements in balance, mobility, physical function, and community reintegration in chronic stroke as against standard physiotherapy.

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