Evaluation of the effect of dietary supplements for physical exercise on oral health status

Madhurima Datta, V. Jothi, Vinutha Bhat, K. Nagendra

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Endurance training has become popular over the past decade and this has increased the consumption of dietary supplements and energy drinks to enhance performance. Literature has revealed the ill effects of these on the athlete’s oral health. The aim of the present study is to assess the oral health status of gyming individuals who consume energy diet and drinks and to estimate its relevance with salivary a -Amylase and Ceruloplasmin levels. Thirty students who have been exercising regularly since the last one year, were included in this study. The participants were divided into 3 groups of 10 members each - controls, not consuming dietary supplements and dietary supplement consumers. Oral health status was recorded using DMFT, CPITN and Plaque index along with estimation of salivary biomarkers. The results of study showed no significant correlation between the consumption of energy food and drinks in exercising individuals and its effect on oral health status. Though consumption of energy drinks and food during exercise make individuals more prone to unfavourable oral health, maintenance of good oral hygiene and utilisation of dental services can limit the negative effects. Clinical significance: This study highlights the role dental professionals in reducing athletes’ chance of developing adverse oral ill-effects by educating them of their risk and providing them with measures to prevent it. This can be brought about through behavioral modifications like frequent sipping of water, limiting consumption of sugary beverages and undergoing regular dental checkups.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)91-100
Number of pages10
JournalInternational Journal of Clinical Dentistry
Volume12
Issue number1
Publication statusPublished - 01-01-2019

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Energy Drinks
Oral Health
Dietary Supplements
Health Status
Exercise
Tooth
Athletes
Periodontal Index
Professional Role
Food
Ceruloplasmin
Oral Hygiene
Beverages
Amylases
Drinking
Biomarkers
Students
Diet

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Dentistry(all)

Cite this

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Evaluation of the effect of dietary supplements for physical exercise on oral health status. / Datta, Madhurima; Jothi, V.; Bhat, Vinutha; Nagendra, K.

In: International Journal of Clinical Dentistry, Vol. 12, No. 1, 01.01.2019, p. 91-100.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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