Fate of Manuscripts Rejected by a Specialty Psychiatry Journal: A Retrospective Cohort Study

Vikas Menon, Karumarakandy Puthiyapurayil Jayaprakashan, Natarajan Varadharajan, Shahul Ameen, Samir Kumar Praharaj

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: Little is known about the publication outcomes of submissions rejected by specialty psychiatry journals. We aimed to investigate the publication fate of original research manuscripts previously rejected by the Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine (IJPM). Methods: A random sampling of manuscripts was drawn from all submissions rejected between January 1, 2018, and December 31, 2019. Using the titles of these papers and the author names, a systematic search of electronic databases was carried out to examine if these manuscripts have been published elsewhere or not. We extracted data on a range of scientific and nonscientific parameters from the journal’s manuscript management portal for every rejected manuscript. Multivariable analysis was used to detect factors associated with eventual publication. Results: Out of 302 manuscripts analyzed, 139 (46.0%) were published elsewhere; of these, only 18 articles (13.0%) were published in a journal with higher standing than IJPM. Manuscripts of foreign origin (odds ratio [OR] 1.77, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.06–2.97) and rejection following peer review or editorial re-review (OR 2.41, 95% CI = 1.22–4.74) were significantly associated with publication. Conclusion: Nearly half of the papers rejected by IJPM were eventually published in other journals, though such papers are more often published in journals with lower standing. Manuscripts rejected following peer review were more likely to reach full publication status compared to those which were desk rejected.

Original languageEnglish
JournalIndian Journal of Psychological Medicine
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 2021

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Clinical Psychology

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