Formulation and evaluation of floating tablets of liquorice extract

H.N. Aswatha Ram, P. Lachake, U. Kaushik, C.S. Shreedhara

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Floating tablets prolong the gastric residence time of drugs, improve bioavailability, and facilitate local drug delivery to the stomach. With this objective, floating tablets containing aqueous extract of liquorice as drug was prepared for the treatment of Helicobacter pylori and gastric ulcers. Methods: The aqueous extract of liquorice was standardized by HPTLC. Tablets containing HPMC K100M (hydrophilic polymer), liquorice extract, sodium bicarbonate (gas generating agent), talc, and magnesium stearate were prepared using direct compression method. The formulations were evaluated for physical parameters like diameter, thickness, hardness, friability, uniformity of weight, drug content, buoyancy time, dissolution, and drug release mechanism. The formulations were optimized on the basis of buoyancy time and in vitro drug release. Results: The diameter of all formulations was in the range 11.166-11.933 mm; thickness was in the range 4.02-4.086 mm. The hardness ranged from 3.1 to 3.5 kg/cm2. All formulations passed the USP requirements for friability and uniformity of weight. The buoyancy time of all tablet formulations was less than 5 min and tablet remained in floating condition throughout the study. All the tablet formulations followed zero-order kinetics and Korsemeyer-Peppas model in drug release. Conclusion: The optimized formulation was found to be F6 which released 98.3% of drug in 8 h in vitro, while the buoyancy time was 3.5 min. Formulations containing psyllium husk, sodium bicarbonate and HPMC K100M in combination can be a promising for gastroretentive drug delivery systems.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)304-308
Number of pages5
JournalPharmacognosy Research
Volume2
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2010

Fingerprint

Glycyrrhiza
Tablets
Sodium Bicarbonate
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Hardness
Stomach
Psyllium
Talc
Weights and Measures
Stomach Ulcer
Drug Delivery Systems
Helicobacter pylori
Biological Availability
Polymers
Gases
Drug Liberation

Cite this

Aswatha Ram, H.N. ; Lachake, P. ; Kaushik, U. ; Shreedhara, C.S. / Formulation and evaluation of floating tablets of liquorice extract. In: Pharmacognosy Research. 2010 ; Vol. 2, No. 5. pp. 304-308.
@article{611b9c0bc46f4c63883b1b56eda5d650,
title = "Formulation and evaluation of floating tablets of liquorice extract",
abstract = "Background: Floating tablets prolong the gastric residence time of drugs, improve bioavailability, and facilitate local drug delivery to the stomach. With this objective, floating tablets containing aqueous extract of liquorice as drug was prepared for the treatment of Helicobacter pylori and gastric ulcers. Methods: The aqueous extract of liquorice was standardized by HPTLC. Tablets containing HPMC K100M (hydrophilic polymer), liquorice extract, sodium bicarbonate (gas generating agent), talc, and magnesium stearate were prepared using direct compression method. The formulations were evaluated for physical parameters like diameter, thickness, hardness, friability, uniformity of weight, drug content, buoyancy time, dissolution, and drug release mechanism. The formulations were optimized on the basis of buoyancy time and in vitro drug release. Results: The diameter of all formulations was in the range 11.166-11.933 mm; thickness was in the range 4.02-4.086 mm. The hardness ranged from 3.1 to 3.5 kg/cm2. All formulations passed the USP requirements for friability and uniformity of weight. The buoyancy time of all tablet formulations was less than 5 min and tablet remained in floating condition throughout the study. All the tablet formulations followed zero-order kinetics and Korsemeyer-Peppas model in drug release. Conclusion: The optimized formulation was found to be F6 which released 98.3{\%} of drug in 8 h in vitro, while the buoyancy time was 3.5 min. Formulations containing psyllium husk, sodium bicarbonate and HPMC K100M in combination can be a promising for gastroretentive drug delivery systems.",
author = "{Aswatha Ram}, H.N. and P. Lachake and U. Kaushik and C.S. Shreedhara",
note = "Cited By :4 Export Date: 10 November 2017 Correspondence Address: Aswatha Ram, H. N.; Department of Pharmacognosy, Manipal College of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Manipal University, Manipal - 576 104, Karnataka, India; email: aswatharam@gmail.com Chemicals/CAS: bicarbonate, 144-55-8, 71-52-3; magnesium stearate, 557-04-0; talc, 14807-96-6 References: Garg, R., Gupta, G.D., Progress in controlled gastrointestinal delivery systems (2008) Tropic J Pharm Res, 7, pp. 1055-66; (1998) Indian Herbal Pharmacopoeia., 1, pp. 89-97. , Indian Drug Manufacturer's Association and Regional Research Laboratory. Jammu Tawi Mumbai: Regional Research Laboratory; Bennet, A., Melhuish, P.B., Stanmford, I.F., Carbenoxolone and deglycyrrhized liquorice have little or no effect on prostanoid synthesis by rat gastric mucosa ex vivo (1985) Br J Pharmacol, 86, pp. 693-5; Yano, S., Harada, M., Watanabe, K., Nakamaru, K., Hatakeyama, Y., Shibata, S., Takahashi, K., Nagata, N., Antiulcer activities of glycyrrhetinic acid derivatives in experimental gastric lesion models (1989) Chemical and Pharmaceutical Bulletin, 37 (9), pp. 2500-2504; Adel, M., Alousi, L.A., Salem, H.A., Licorice: A possible anti-infammatory and anti-ulcer drug (2005) AAPS Pharm Sci Tech, 6, pp. 74-82; Jafarian, M.M., Ghazvini, K., In vitro susceptibility of Helicobacter pylori to licorice extract (2007) Iranian Journal of Pharmaceutical Research, 6 (1), pp. 69-72. , http://www.ijpr-online.com/docs/20071/IJPR302.pdf; Rajpal, V., (2002) Standardization of Botanicals: Testing and Extraction Methods of Medicinal Herbs., 1, pp. 115-39. , New Delhi: Eastern Publishers;; Basak, S.C., Rao, K.N., Manavalan, R., Rao, P.R., Development and in vitro evaluation of an oral foating matrix tablet formulation of ciprofoxacin (2004) Indian J Pharm Sci, 66, pp. 313-6; Wagner, J.G., Interpretation of percent dissolved-time plots derived from in vitro testing of conventional tablets and capsules (1969) J Pharm Sci, 58, pp. 1253-7; Higuchi, W.I., Diffusional models useful in biopharmaceutics-Drug release rate processes (1967) J Pharm Sci, 56, p. 315; Peppas, N.A., Ritger, P.L., A simple equation for description of solute release II. Fickian and anomalous release from swellable devices (1987) J Control Release, 5, p. 37; Timmermans, J., Moes, A.J., Factors controlling the buoyancy and gastric retention capabilities of floating matrix capsules: New data for reconsidering the controversy (1994) Journal of Pharmaceutical Sciences, 83 (1), pp. 18-24. , DOI 10.1002/jps.2600830106; Patel, V.F., Patel, N.M., Yeole, P.G., Studies on formulation and evaluation of ranitidine foating tablets (2005) Indian J Pharm Sci, 67, pp. 703-9; Arora, S., Ali, J., Ahuja, A., Khar, R.K., Baboota, S., Floating drug delivery systems: A review (2005) AAPS PharmSciTech, 6 (3), p. 47. , http://www.aapspharmscitech.org/view.asp?art=pt060347, DOI 10.1208/pt060347; Kokate, C.K., Purohit, A.P., Gokhale, S.B., (2002) Pharmacognosy 22nd Ed, pp. 149-51. , Pune: Nirali Prakashan",
year = "2010",
doi = "10.4103/0976-4836.72329",
language = "English",
volume = "2",
pages = "304--308",
journal = "Pharmacognosy Research",
issn = "0974-8490",
publisher = "Medknow Publications and Media Pvt. Ltd",
number = "5",

}

Formulation and evaluation of floating tablets of liquorice extract. / Aswatha Ram, H.N.; Lachake, P.; Kaushik, U.; Shreedhara, C.S.

In: Pharmacognosy Research, Vol. 2, No. 5, 2010, p. 304-308.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Formulation and evaluation of floating tablets of liquorice extract

AU - Aswatha Ram, H.N.

AU - Lachake, P.

AU - Kaushik, U.

AU - Shreedhara, C.S.

N1 - Cited By :4 Export Date: 10 November 2017 Correspondence Address: Aswatha Ram, H. N.; Department of Pharmacognosy, Manipal College of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Manipal University, Manipal - 576 104, Karnataka, India; email: aswatharam@gmail.com Chemicals/CAS: bicarbonate, 144-55-8, 71-52-3; magnesium stearate, 557-04-0; talc, 14807-96-6 References: Garg, R., Gupta, G.D., Progress in controlled gastrointestinal delivery systems (2008) Tropic J Pharm Res, 7, pp. 1055-66; (1998) Indian Herbal Pharmacopoeia., 1, pp. 89-97. , Indian Drug Manufacturer's Association and Regional Research Laboratory. Jammu Tawi Mumbai: Regional Research Laboratory; Bennet, A., Melhuish, P.B., Stanmford, I.F., Carbenoxolone and deglycyrrhized liquorice have little or no effect on prostanoid synthesis by rat gastric mucosa ex vivo (1985) Br J Pharmacol, 86, pp. 693-5; Yano, S., Harada, M., Watanabe, K., Nakamaru, K., Hatakeyama, Y., Shibata, S., Takahashi, K., Nagata, N., Antiulcer activities of glycyrrhetinic acid derivatives in experimental gastric lesion models (1989) Chemical and Pharmaceutical Bulletin, 37 (9), pp. 2500-2504; Adel, M., Alousi, L.A., Salem, H.A., Licorice: A possible anti-infammatory and anti-ulcer drug (2005) AAPS Pharm Sci Tech, 6, pp. 74-82; Jafarian, M.M., Ghazvini, K., In vitro susceptibility of Helicobacter pylori to licorice extract (2007) Iranian Journal of Pharmaceutical Research, 6 (1), pp. 69-72. , http://www.ijpr-online.com/docs/20071/IJPR302.pdf; Rajpal, V., (2002) Standardization of Botanicals: Testing and Extraction Methods of Medicinal Herbs., 1, pp. 115-39. , New Delhi: Eastern Publishers;; Basak, S.C., Rao, K.N., Manavalan, R., Rao, P.R., Development and in vitro evaluation of an oral foating matrix tablet formulation of ciprofoxacin (2004) Indian J Pharm Sci, 66, pp. 313-6; Wagner, J.G., Interpretation of percent dissolved-time plots derived from in vitro testing of conventional tablets and capsules (1969) J Pharm Sci, 58, pp. 1253-7; Higuchi, W.I., Diffusional models useful in biopharmaceutics-Drug release rate processes (1967) J Pharm Sci, 56, p. 315; Peppas, N.A., Ritger, P.L., A simple equation for description of solute release II. Fickian and anomalous release from swellable devices (1987) J Control Release, 5, p. 37; Timmermans, J., Moes, A.J., Factors controlling the buoyancy and gastric retention capabilities of floating matrix capsules: New data for reconsidering the controversy (1994) Journal of Pharmaceutical Sciences, 83 (1), pp. 18-24. , DOI 10.1002/jps.2600830106; Patel, V.F., Patel, N.M., Yeole, P.G., Studies on formulation and evaluation of ranitidine foating tablets (2005) Indian J Pharm Sci, 67, pp. 703-9; Arora, S., Ali, J., Ahuja, A., Khar, R.K., Baboota, S., Floating drug delivery systems: A review (2005) AAPS PharmSciTech, 6 (3), p. 47. , http://www.aapspharmscitech.org/view.asp?art=pt060347, DOI 10.1208/pt060347; Kokate, C.K., Purohit, A.P., Gokhale, S.B., (2002) Pharmacognosy 22nd Ed, pp. 149-51. , Pune: Nirali Prakashan

PY - 2010

Y1 - 2010

N2 - Background: Floating tablets prolong the gastric residence time of drugs, improve bioavailability, and facilitate local drug delivery to the stomach. With this objective, floating tablets containing aqueous extract of liquorice as drug was prepared for the treatment of Helicobacter pylori and gastric ulcers. Methods: The aqueous extract of liquorice was standardized by HPTLC. Tablets containing HPMC K100M (hydrophilic polymer), liquorice extract, sodium bicarbonate (gas generating agent), talc, and magnesium stearate were prepared using direct compression method. The formulations were evaluated for physical parameters like diameter, thickness, hardness, friability, uniformity of weight, drug content, buoyancy time, dissolution, and drug release mechanism. The formulations were optimized on the basis of buoyancy time and in vitro drug release. Results: The diameter of all formulations was in the range 11.166-11.933 mm; thickness was in the range 4.02-4.086 mm. The hardness ranged from 3.1 to 3.5 kg/cm2. All formulations passed the USP requirements for friability and uniformity of weight. The buoyancy time of all tablet formulations was less than 5 min and tablet remained in floating condition throughout the study. All the tablet formulations followed zero-order kinetics and Korsemeyer-Peppas model in drug release. Conclusion: The optimized formulation was found to be F6 which released 98.3% of drug in 8 h in vitro, while the buoyancy time was 3.5 min. Formulations containing psyllium husk, sodium bicarbonate and HPMC K100M in combination can be a promising for gastroretentive drug delivery systems.

AB - Background: Floating tablets prolong the gastric residence time of drugs, improve bioavailability, and facilitate local drug delivery to the stomach. With this objective, floating tablets containing aqueous extract of liquorice as drug was prepared for the treatment of Helicobacter pylori and gastric ulcers. Methods: The aqueous extract of liquorice was standardized by HPTLC. Tablets containing HPMC K100M (hydrophilic polymer), liquorice extract, sodium bicarbonate (gas generating agent), talc, and magnesium stearate were prepared using direct compression method. The formulations were evaluated for physical parameters like diameter, thickness, hardness, friability, uniformity of weight, drug content, buoyancy time, dissolution, and drug release mechanism. The formulations were optimized on the basis of buoyancy time and in vitro drug release. Results: The diameter of all formulations was in the range 11.166-11.933 mm; thickness was in the range 4.02-4.086 mm. The hardness ranged from 3.1 to 3.5 kg/cm2. All formulations passed the USP requirements for friability and uniformity of weight. The buoyancy time of all tablet formulations was less than 5 min and tablet remained in floating condition throughout the study. All the tablet formulations followed zero-order kinetics and Korsemeyer-Peppas model in drug release. Conclusion: The optimized formulation was found to be F6 which released 98.3% of drug in 8 h in vitro, while the buoyancy time was 3.5 min. Formulations containing psyllium husk, sodium bicarbonate and HPMC K100M in combination can be a promising for gastroretentive drug delivery systems.

U2 - 10.4103/0976-4836.72329

DO - 10.4103/0976-4836.72329

M3 - Article

VL - 2

SP - 304

EP - 308

JO - Pharmacognosy Research

JF - Pharmacognosy Research

SN - 0974-8490

IS - 5

ER -