Giant cell rich osteosarcoma of the cuneiforms

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Osteosarcoma is the commonest primary malignant bone tumor in children and adolescents. Giant cell rich osteosarcoma is a rare subtype of conventional osteosarcoma. Osteosarcomas commonly involve the metaphysis and meta-diaphysis of long bones. We report a 19-year-old girl with giant cell rich osteosarcoma of the medial and intermediate cuneiform bones. Even though, giant cell rich osteosarcoma is frequently mistaken for osteoclastoma of the bone; age of onset, location of lesion, radiological features, and histological characteristics on a high power field helps to differentiate the two conditions. Appropriate and early diagnosis of this variant possibly averts severe morbidity and mortality to the patient. Nonmetastatic osteosarcomas in the foot have better prognosis and are amenable to limb salvage surgeries.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)989-992
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of Cancer Research and Therapeutics
Volume11
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 01-10-2015

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Osteosarcoma
Giant Cells
Bone and Bones
Tarsal Bones
Diaphyses
Limb Salvage
Age of Onset
Foot
Early Diagnosis
Morbidity
Mortality
Neoplasms

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Oncology
  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging

Cite this

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title = "Giant cell rich osteosarcoma of the cuneiforms",
abstract = "Osteosarcoma is the commonest primary malignant bone tumor in children and adolescents. Giant cell rich osteosarcoma is a rare subtype of conventional osteosarcoma. Osteosarcomas commonly involve the metaphysis and meta-diaphysis of long bones. We report a 19-year-old girl with giant cell rich osteosarcoma of the medial and intermediate cuneiform bones. Even though, giant cell rich osteosarcoma is frequently mistaken for osteoclastoma of the bone; age of onset, location of lesion, radiological features, and histological characteristics on a high power field helps to differentiate the two conditions. Appropriate and early diagnosis of this variant possibly averts severe morbidity and mortality to the patient. Nonmetastatic osteosarcomas in the foot have better prognosis and are amenable to limb salvage surgeries.",
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Giant cell rich osteosarcoma of the cuneiforms. / Vijayan, Sandeep; Naik, Monappa A.; Hameed, Shamsi Abdul; Rao, Sharath K.

In: Journal of Cancer Research and Therapeutics, Vol. 11, No. 4, 01.10.2015, p. 989-992.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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