Glycosylated haemoglobin as a risk predictor of coronary artery disease in patients with stable Angina

Deepak Uppunda, Ranjan K. Shetty, Pragna Rao, Abdul Razak, Kiran Shetty, Prasad Narayan Shetty, Ravishanker, Ajit Singh

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Introduction: Glycosylated HaemoglobinA1c (HbA1c) is a time-integrated marker for glycaemic control. It also helps in predicting the risk of Coronary Artery Disease (CAD) among diabetic patients. Aim: To determine the association between HbA1c and severity of CAD in patients with stable angina. Materials and Methods: A total of 144 patients with the positive cardiac stress test and stable angina who are undergoing a Coronary Angiogram (CAG) were enrolled. The patients were classified into three groups according to baseline HbA1c level (Normal group <5.6%, n=53; pre diabetic group 5.7-6.4%, n=62; diabetic group >6.4%, n=29). One-way ANOVA test analysed baseline characteristics of the study population. The association between HbA1c level and the risk of CADs was calculated by Pearson correlation. A p-value less than 0.05 considered to be significant. Results: The subjects who were pre diabetic have 1.77 times more odds of having CAD than the patients who are normal OR (95% CI)=1.77 (0.84,3.73). Patients who have diabetes have 3.13 times more odds of having CAD than the patients who are normal OR (95% CI)=3.13 (1.20,8.16), p=0.02. Higher HbA1c levels were associated with higher incidence of CAD. Conclusion: The study concluded that there was a significant association between raised baseline HbA1c levels and occurrence of CAD in patients with positive cardiac stress test/ stable angina.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)BC10-BC12
JournalJournal of Clinical and Diagnostic Research
Volume12
Issue number9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 01-09-2018

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Stable Angina
Glycosylated Hemoglobin A
Coronary Artery Disease
Exercise Test
Medical problems
Analysis of variance (ANOVA)
Computer aided design
Population Characteristics
Analysis of Variance
Angiography
Incidence

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Clinical Biochemistry

Cite this

Uppunda, Deepak ; Shetty, Ranjan K. ; Rao, Pragna ; Razak, Abdul ; Shetty, Kiran ; Shetty, Prasad Narayan ; Ravishanker ; Singh, Ajit. / Glycosylated haemoglobin as a risk predictor of coronary artery disease in patients with stable Angina. In: Journal of Clinical and Diagnostic Research. 2018 ; Vol. 12, No. 9. pp. BC10-BC12.
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abstract = "Introduction: Glycosylated HaemoglobinA1c (HbA1c) is a time-integrated marker for glycaemic control. It also helps in predicting the risk of Coronary Artery Disease (CAD) among diabetic patients. Aim: To determine the association between HbA1c and severity of CAD in patients with stable angina. Materials and Methods: A total of 144 patients with the positive cardiac stress test and stable angina who are undergoing a Coronary Angiogram (CAG) were enrolled. The patients were classified into three groups according to baseline HbA1c level (Normal group <5.6{\%}, n=53; pre diabetic group 5.7-6.4{\%}, n=62; diabetic group >6.4{\%}, n=29). One-way ANOVA test analysed baseline characteristics of the study population. The association between HbA1c level and the risk of CADs was calculated by Pearson correlation. A p-value less than 0.05 considered to be significant. Results: The subjects who were pre diabetic have 1.77 times more odds of having CAD than the patients who are normal OR (95{\%} CI)=1.77 (0.84,3.73). Patients who have diabetes have 3.13 times more odds of having CAD than the patients who are normal OR (95{\%} CI)=3.13 (1.20,8.16), p=0.02. Higher HbA1c levels were associated with higher incidence of CAD. Conclusion: The study concluded that there was a significant association between raised baseline HbA1c levels and occurrence of CAD in patients with positive cardiac stress test/ stable angina.",
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Glycosylated haemoglobin as a risk predictor of coronary artery disease in patients with stable Angina. / Uppunda, Deepak; Shetty, Ranjan K.; Rao, Pragna; Razak, Abdul; Shetty, Kiran; Shetty, Prasad Narayan; Ravishanker; Singh, Ajit.

In: Journal of Clinical and Diagnostic Research, Vol. 12, No. 9, 01.09.2018, p. BC10-BC12.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Glycosylated haemoglobin as a risk predictor of coronary artery disease in patients with stable Angina

AU - Uppunda, Deepak

AU - Shetty, Ranjan K.

AU - Rao, Pragna

AU - Razak, Abdul

AU - Shetty, Kiran

AU - Shetty, Prasad Narayan

AU - Ravishanker,

AU - Singh, Ajit

PY - 2018/9/1

Y1 - 2018/9/1

N2 - Introduction: Glycosylated HaemoglobinA1c (HbA1c) is a time-integrated marker for glycaemic control. It also helps in predicting the risk of Coronary Artery Disease (CAD) among diabetic patients. Aim: To determine the association between HbA1c and severity of CAD in patients with stable angina. Materials and Methods: A total of 144 patients with the positive cardiac stress test and stable angina who are undergoing a Coronary Angiogram (CAG) were enrolled. The patients were classified into three groups according to baseline HbA1c level (Normal group <5.6%, n=53; pre diabetic group 5.7-6.4%, n=62; diabetic group >6.4%, n=29). One-way ANOVA test analysed baseline characteristics of the study population. The association between HbA1c level and the risk of CADs was calculated by Pearson correlation. A p-value less than 0.05 considered to be significant. Results: The subjects who were pre diabetic have 1.77 times more odds of having CAD than the patients who are normal OR (95% CI)=1.77 (0.84,3.73). Patients who have diabetes have 3.13 times more odds of having CAD than the patients who are normal OR (95% CI)=3.13 (1.20,8.16), p=0.02. Higher HbA1c levels were associated with higher incidence of CAD. Conclusion: The study concluded that there was a significant association between raised baseline HbA1c levels and occurrence of CAD in patients with positive cardiac stress test/ stable angina.

AB - Introduction: Glycosylated HaemoglobinA1c (HbA1c) is a time-integrated marker for glycaemic control. It also helps in predicting the risk of Coronary Artery Disease (CAD) among diabetic patients. Aim: To determine the association between HbA1c and severity of CAD in patients with stable angina. Materials and Methods: A total of 144 patients with the positive cardiac stress test and stable angina who are undergoing a Coronary Angiogram (CAG) were enrolled. The patients were classified into three groups according to baseline HbA1c level (Normal group <5.6%, n=53; pre diabetic group 5.7-6.4%, n=62; diabetic group >6.4%, n=29). One-way ANOVA test analysed baseline characteristics of the study population. The association between HbA1c level and the risk of CADs was calculated by Pearson correlation. A p-value less than 0.05 considered to be significant. Results: The subjects who were pre diabetic have 1.77 times more odds of having CAD than the patients who are normal OR (95% CI)=1.77 (0.84,3.73). Patients who have diabetes have 3.13 times more odds of having CAD than the patients who are normal OR (95% CI)=3.13 (1.20,8.16), p=0.02. Higher HbA1c levels were associated with higher incidence of CAD. Conclusion: The study concluded that there was a significant association between raised baseline HbA1c levels and occurrence of CAD in patients with positive cardiac stress test/ stable angina.

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JF - Journal of Clinical and Diagnostic Research

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