Imbalance in A2and A2B phenotype frequency of ABO group in South India

Shamee Shastry, Sudha Bhat

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background. The heterogeneity of A and B alleles results in weak variants of these antigens. Subgroups of A differ from each other quantitatively and qualitatively. The expected frequencies of A1 and A2 subtypes will be in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium for the Mendelian inheritance of the allelic A1 and A2 genes. The frequency of A subgroups in the population from south India is not known. The aim of our study was to study the frequency of A subtypes and the prevalence of anti-A1 antibody among this population. Methods. Over a period of 3 years, patients' blood group was typed using a standard tube technique. Anti-A1 lectin studies were done for all patients with groups A and AB. Based on serological reactivity the samples were classified into A1/A1B, A 2/A2B and weak A subgroups. The prevalence of A subgroups was determined. The significance of differences in proportions was analysed using the chi-square test. Results. A total of 40,113 patients' samples were typed for ABO, Rh group and A subgroups in our blood bank attached to a tertiary care hospital. Among 10,325 group A samples, 98.14% classified as A 1, 1.07% as A2, and 0.01% as weak A; the remaining group A samples were from neonates and reacted poorly with anti A1-lectin. The majority of AB samples (n=2,667) were of A1B type (89.28%). However, the proportion of A2B (8.99%) among AB samples was significantly higher than that of A2 in group A samples (p < 0.0001). The prevalence of anti-A1 antibodies among A2 and A2B samples was 1.8% and 3.75%, respectively, and none of them showed reactivity at 37°C. Conclusion. The results of our study show a significantly higher proportion of A2B subtypes than A2 subgroups. A similar imbalance is seen in blacks and Japanese. The incidence of anti-A1 antibodies is also higher among A2B patients.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)267-270
Number of pages4
JournalBlood Transfusion
Volume8
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 04-11-2010

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varespladib methyl
India
Phenotype
Anti-Idiotypic Antibodies
Lectins
Blood Banks
Tertiary Healthcare
Chi-Square Distribution
Blood Group Antigens
Tertiary Care Centers
Population
Alleles
Newborn Infant
Antigens
Incidence
Genes

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Hematology

Cite this

@article{4859460453924e70b1955671575e9aeb,
title = "Imbalance in A2and A2B phenotype frequency of ABO group in South India",
abstract = "Background. The heterogeneity of A and B alleles results in weak variants of these antigens. Subgroups of A differ from each other quantitatively and qualitatively. The expected frequencies of A1 and A2 subtypes will be in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium for the Mendelian inheritance of the allelic A1 and A2 genes. The frequency of A subgroups in the population from south India is not known. The aim of our study was to study the frequency of A subtypes and the prevalence of anti-A1 antibody among this population. Methods. Over a period of 3 years, patients' blood group was typed using a standard tube technique. Anti-A1 lectin studies were done for all patients with groups A and AB. Based on serological reactivity the samples were classified into A1/A1B, A 2/A2B and weak A subgroups. The prevalence of A subgroups was determined. The significance of differences in proportions was analysed using the chi-square test. Results. A total of 40,113 patients' samples were typed for ABO, Rh group and A subgroups in our blood bank attached to a tertiary care hospital. Among 10,325 group A samples, 98.14{\%} classified as A 1, 1.07{\%} as A2, and 0.01{\%} as weak A; the remaining group A samples were from neonates and reacted poorly with anti A1-lectin. The majority of AB samples (n=2,667) were of A1B type (89.28{\%}). However, the proportion of A2B (8.99{\%}) among AB samples was significantly higher than that of A2 in group A samples (p < 0.0001). The prevalence of anti-A1 antibodies among A2 and A2B samples was 1.8{\%} and 3.75{\%}, respectively, and none of them showed reactivity at 37°C. Conclusion. The results of our study show a significantly higher proportion of A2B subtypes than A2 subgroups. A similar imbalance is seen in blacks and Japanese. The incidence of anti-A1 antibodies is also higher among A2B patients.",
author = "Shamee Shastry and Sudha Bhat",
year = "2010",
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language = "English",
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Imbalance in A2and A2B phenotype frequency of ABO group in South India. / Shastry, Shamee; Bhat, Sudha.

In: Blood Transfusion, Vol. 8, No. 4, 04.11.2010, p. 267-270.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Imbalance in A2and A2B phenotype frequency of ABO group in South India

AU - Shastry, Shamee

AU - Bhat, Sudha

PY - 2010/11/4

Y1 - 2010/11/4

N2 - Background. The heterogeneity of A and B alleles results in weak variants of these antigens. Subgroups of A differ from each other quantitatively and qualitatively. The expected frequencies of A1 and A2 subtypes will be in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium for the Mendelian inheritance of the allelic A1 and A2 genes. The frequency of A subgroups in the population from south India is not known. The aim of our study was to study the frequency of A subtypes and the prevalence of anti-A1 antibody among this population. Methods. Over a period of 3 years, patients' blood group was typed using a standard tube technique. Anti-A1 lectin studies were done for all patients with groups A and AB. Based on serological reactivity the samples were classified into A1/A1B, A 2/A2B and weak A subgroups. The prevalence of A subgroups was determined. The significance of differences in proportions was analysed using the chi-square test. Results. A total of 40,113 patients' samples were typed for ABO, Rh group and A subgroups in our blood bank attached to a tertiary care hospital. Among 10,325 group A samples, 98.14% classified as A 1, 1.07% as A2, and 0.01% as weak A; the remaining group A samples were from neonates and reacted poorly with anti A1-lectin. The majority of AB samples (n=2,667) were of A1B type (89.28%). However, the proportion of A2B (8.99%) among AB samples was significantly higher than that of A2 in group A samples (p < 0.0001). The prevalence of anti-A1 antibodies among A2 and A2B samples was 1.8% and 3.75%, respectively, and none of them showed reactivity at 37°C. Conclusion. The results of our study show a significantly higher proportion of A2B subtypes than A2 subgroups. A similar imbalance is seen in blacks and Japanese. The incidence of anti-A1 antibodies is also higher among A2B patients.

AB - Background. The heterogeneity of A and B alleles results in weak variants of these antigens. Subgroups of A differ from each other quantitatively and qualitatively. The expected frequencies of A1 and A2 subtypes will be in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium for the Mendelian inheritance of the allelic A1 and A2 genes. The frequency of A subgroups in the population from south India is not known. The aim of our study was to study the frequency of A subtypes and the prevalence of anti-A1 antibody among this population. Methods. Over a period of 3 years, patients' blood group was typed using a standard tube technique. Anti-A1 lectin studies were done for all patients with groups A and AB. Based on serological reactivity the samples were classified into A1/A1B, A 2/A2B and weak A subgroups. The prevalence of A subgroups was determined. The significance of differences in proportions was analysed using the chi-square test. Results. A total of 40,113 patients' samples were typed for ABO, Rh group and A subgroups in our blood bank attached to a tertiary care hospital. Among 10,325 group A samples, 98.14% classified as A 1, 1.07% as A2, and 0.01% as weak A; the remaining group A samples were from neonates and reacted poorly with anti A1-lectin. The majority of AB samples (n=2,667) were of A1B type (89.28%). However, the proportion of A2B (8.99%) among AB samples was significantly higher than that of A2 in group A samples (p < 0.0001). The prevalence of anti-A1 antibodies among A2 and A2B samples was 1.8% and 3.75%, respectively, and none of them showed reactivity at 37°C. Conclusion. The results of our study show a significantly higher proportion of A2B subtypes than A2 subgroups. A similar imbalance is seen in blacks and Japanese. The incidence of anti-A1 antibodies is also higher among A2B patients.

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