Impact of genetic notification on smoking cessation

Systematic review and pooled-analysis

Sylviane de Viron, Johan van der Heyden, Elena Ambrosino, Marc Arbyn, Angela Brand, Herman van Oyen

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: This study aimed to evaluate the impact of genetic notification of smoking-related disease risk on smoking cessation in the general population. Secondary objectives were to assess the impact of genetic notification on intention-to-quit smoking and on emotional outcomes as well as the understanding and the recall of this notification. Methods: A systematic review of articles from inception to August 2011 without language restriction was realized using PubMed, Embase, Scopus, Web of Science, PsycINFO and Toxnet. Other publications were identified using hand search. The pooled-analysis included only randomized trials. Comparison groups were (i) high and low genetic risk versus control, and (ii) high versus low genetic risk. For the pooled-analysis random effect models were applied and sensitivity analyses were conducted. Results: Eight papers from seven different studies met the inclusion criteria of the review. High genetic risk notification was associated with short-term increased depression and anxiety. Four randomized studies were included in the pooled-analysis, which revealed a significant impact of genetic notification on smoking cessation in comparison to controls (clinical risk notification or no intervention) in short term follow-up less than 6 months (RR = 1.55, 95% CI 1.09-2.21). Conclusions: In short term follow-up, genetic notification increased smoking cessation in comparison to control interventions. However, there is no evidence of long term effect (up to 12 month) on smoking cessation. Further research is needed to assess more in depth how genetic notification of smoking-related disease could contribute to smoking cessation.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere40230
JournalPLoS One
Volume7
Issue number7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 11-07-2012

Fingerprint

systematic review
Smoking Cessation
Smoking
PubMed
Language
Anxiety
Depression
anxiety
long term effects
Research
Population

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

de Viron, S., van der Heyden, J., Ambrosino, E., Arbyn, M., Brand, A., & van Oyen, H. (2012). Impact of genetic notification on smoking cessation: Systematic review and pooled-analysis. PLoS One, 7(7), [e40230]. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0040230
de Viron, Sylviane ; van der Heyden, Johan ; Ambrosino, Elena ; Arbyn, Marc ; Brand, Angela ; van Oyen, Herman. / Impact of genetic notification on smoking cessation : Systematic review and pooled-analysis. In: PLoS One. 2012 ; Vol. 7, No. 7.
@article{32f50699f1e14b5788e754d65cefc665,
title = "Impact of genetic notification on smoking cessation: Systematic review and pooled-analysis",
abstract = "Objectives: This study aimed to evaluate the impact of genetic notification of smoking-related disease risk on smoking cessation in the general population. Secondary objectives were to assess the impact of genetic notification on intention-to-quit smoking and on emotional outcomes as well as the understanding and the recall of this notification. Methods: A systematic review of articles from inception to August 2011 without language restriction was realized using PubMed, Embase, Scopus, Web of Science, PsycINFO and Toxnet. Other publications were identified using hand search. The pooled-analysis included only randomized trials. Comparison groups were (i) high and low genetic risk versus control, and (ii) high versus low genetic risk. For the pooled-analysis random effect models were applied and sensitivity analyses were conducted. Results: Eight papers from seven different studies met the inclusion criteria of the review. High genetic risk notification was associated with short-term increased depression and anxiety. Four randomized studies were included in the pooled-analysis, which revealed a significant impact of genetic notification on smoking cessation in comparison to controls (clinical risk notification or no intervention) in short term follow-up less than 6 months (RR = 1.55, 95{\%} CI 1.09-2.21). Conclusions: In short term follow-up, genetic notification increased smoking cessation in comparison to control interventions. However, there is no evidence of long term effect (up to 12 month) on smoking cessation. Further research is needed to assess more in depth how genetic notification of smoking-related disease could contribute to smoking cessation.",
author = "{de Viron}, Sylviane and {van der Heyden}, Johan and Elena Ambrosino and Marc Arbyn and Angela Brand and {van Oyen}, Herman",
year = "2012",
month = "7",
day = "11",
doi = "10.1371/journal.pone.0040230",
language = "English",
volume = "7",
journal = "PLoS One",
issn = "1932-6203",
publisher = "Public Library of Science",
number = "7",

}

de Viron, S, van der Heyden, J, Ambrosino, E, Arbyn, M, Brand, A & van Oyen, H 2012, 'Impact of genetic notification on smoking cessation: Systematic review and pooled-analysis', PLoS One, vol. 7, no. 7, e40230. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0040230

Impact of genetic notification on smoking cessation : Systematic review and pooled-analysis. / de Viron, Sylviane; van der Heyden, Johan; Ambrosino, Elena; Arbyn, Marc; Brand, Angela; van Oyen, Herman.

In: PLoS One, Vol. 7, No. 7, e40230, 11.07.2012.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

TY - JOUR

T1 - Impact of genetic notification on smoking cessation

T2 - Systematic review and pooled-analysis

AU - de Viron, Sylviane

AU - van der Heyden, Johan

AU - Ambrosino, Elena

AU - Arbyn, Marc

AU - Brand, Angela

AU - van Oyen, Herman

PY - 2012/7/11

Y1 - 2012/7/11

N2 - Objectives: This study aimed to evaluate the impact of genetic notification of smoking-related disease risk on smoking cessation in the general population. Secondary objectives were to assess the impact of genetic notification on intention-to-quit smoking and on emotional outcomes as well as the understanding and the recall of this notification. Methods: A systematic review of articles from inception to August 2011 without language restriction was realized using PubMed, Embase, Scopus, Web of Science, PsycINFO and Toxnet. Other publications were identified using hand search. The pooled-analysis included only randomized trials. Comparison groups were (i) high and low genetic risk versus control, and (ii) high versus low genetic risk. For the pooled-analysis random effect models were applied and sensitivity analyses were conducted. Results: Eight papers from seven different studies met the inclusion criteria of the review. High genetic risk notification was associated with short-term increased depression and anxiety. Four randomized studies were included in the pooled-analysis, which revealed a significant impact of genetic notification on smoking cessation in comparison to controls (clinical risk notification or no intervention) in short term follow-up less than 6 months (RR = 1.55, 95% CI 1.09-2.21). Conclusions: In short term follow-up, genetic notification increased smoking cessation in comparison to control interventions. However, there is no evidence of long term effect (up to 12 month) on smoking cessation. Further research is needed to assess more in depth how genetic notification of smoking-related disease could contribute to smoking cessation.

AB - Objectives: This study aimed to evaluate the impact of genetic notification of smoking-related disease risk on smoking cessation in the general population. Secondary objectives were to assess the impact of genetic notification on intention-to-quit smoking and on emotional outcomes as well as the understanding and the recall of this notification. Methods: A systematic review of articles from inception to August 2011 without language restriction was realized using PubMed, Embase, Scopus, Web of Science, PsycINFO and Toxnet. Other publications were identified using hand search. The pooled-analysis included only randomized trials. Comparison groups were (i) high and low genetic risk versus control, and (ii) high versus low genetic risk. For the pooled-analysis random effect models were applied and sensitivity analyses were conducted. Results: Eight papers from seven different studies met the inclusion criteria of the review. High genetic risk notification was associated with short-term increased depression and anxiety. Four randomized studies were included in the pooled-analysis, which revealed a significant impact of genetic notification on smoking cessation in comparison to controls (clinical risk notification or no intervention) in short term follow-up less than 6 months (RR = 1.55, 95% CI 1.09-2.21). Conclusions: In short term follow-up, genetic notification increased smoking cessation in comparison to control interventions. However, there is no evidence of long term effect (up to 12 month) on smoking cessation. Further research is needed to assess more in depth how genetic notification of smoking-related disease could contribute to smoking cessation.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84863833761&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84863833761&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1371/journal.pone.0040230

DO - 10.1371/journal.pone.0040230

M3 - Review article

VL - 7

JO - PLoS One

JF - PLoS One

SN - 1932-6203

IS - 7

M1 - e40230

ER -