Improving Visibility of Stereo-Radiographic Spine Reconstruction with Geometric Inferences

Sampath Kumar, K. Prabhakar Nayak, K. S. Hareesha

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Complex deformities of the spine, like scoliosis, are evaluated more precisely using stereo-radiographic 3D reconstruction techniques. Primarily, it uses six stereo-corresponding points available on the vertebral body for the 3D reconstruction of each vertebra. The wireframe structure obtained in this process has poor visualization, hence difficult to diagnose. In this paper, a novel method is proposed to improve the visibility of this wireframe structure using a deformation of a generic spine model in accordance with the 3D-reconstructed corresponding points. Then, the geometric inferences like vertebral orientations are automatically extracted from the radiographs to improve the visibility of the 3D model. Biplanar radiographs are acquired from five scoliotic subjects on a specifically designed calibration bench. The stereo-corresponding point reconstruction method is used to build six-point wireframe vertebral structures and thus the entire spine model. Using the 3D spine midline and automatically extracted vertebral orientation features, a more realistic 3D spine model is generated. To validate the method, the 3D spine model is back-projected on biplanar radiographs and the error difference is computed. Though, this difference is within the error limits available in the literature, the proposed work is simple and economical. The proposed method does not require more corresponding points and image features to improve the visibility of the model. Hence, it reduces the computational complexity. Expensive 3D digitizer and vertebral CT scan models are also excluded from this study. Thus, the visibility of stereo-corresponding point reconstruction is improved to obtain a low-cost spine model for a better diagnosis of spinal deformities.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)226-234
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Digital Imaging
Volume29
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 01-04-2016

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Visibility
Spine
Computerized tomography
Scoliosis
Calibration
Computational complexity
Visualization
Costs and Cost Analysis
Costs

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Radiological and Ultrasound Technology
  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging
  • Computer Science Applications

Cite this

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abstract = "Complex deformities of the spine, like scoliosis, are evaluated more precisely using stereo-radiographic 3D reconstruction techniques. Primarily, it uses six stereo-corresponding points available on the vertebral body for the 3D reconstruction of each vertebra. The wireframe structure obtained in this process has poor visualization, hence difficult to diagnose. In this paper, a novel method is proposed to improve the visibility of this wireframe structure using a deformation of a generic spine model in accordance with the 3D-reconstructed corresponding points. Then, the geometric inferences like vertebral orientations are automatically extracted from the radiographs to improve the visibility of the 3D model. Biplanar radiographs are acquired from five scoliotic subjects on a specifically designed calibration bench. The stereo-corresponding point reconstruction method is used to build six-point wireframe vertebral structures and thus the entire spine model. Using the 3D spine midline and automatically extracted vertebral orientation features, a more realistic 3D spine model is generated. To validate the method, the 3D spine model is back-projected on biplanar radiographs and the error difference is computed. Though, this difference is within the error limits available in the literature, the proposed work is simple and economical. The proposed method does not require more corresponding points and image features to improve the visibility of the model. Hence, it reduces the computational complexity. Expensive 3D digitizer and vertebral CT scan models are also excluded from this study. Thus, the visibility of stereo-corresponding point reconstruction is improved to obtain a low-cost spine model for a better diagnosis of spinal deformities.",
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Improving Visibility of Stereo-Radiographic Spine Reconstruction with Geometric Inferences. / Kumar, Sampath; Nayak, K. Prabhakar; Hareesha, K. S.

In: Journal of Digital Imaging, Vol. 29, No. 2, 01.04.2016, p. 226-234.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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