Influence of iron deficiency anemia on hemoglobin A1C levels in diabetic individuals with controlled plasma glucose levels

Alap L. Christy, Poornima A. Manjrekar, Ruby P. Babu, Anupama Hegde, M. S. Rukmini

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10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Introduction: Hemoglobin A1C (HbA1c) reflects patient's glycemic status over the previous 3 months. Previous studies have reported that iron deficiency may elevate A1C concentrations, independent of glycemia. This study is aimed to analyze the effect of iron deficiency anemia on HbA1c levels in diabetic population having plasma glucose levels in control. Methods: Totally, 120 diabetic, iron-deficient anemic individuals (70 females and 50 males) having controlled plasma glucose levels with same number of iron-sufficient non-anemic individuals were streamlined for the study. Their data of HbA1c (Bio-Rad D-10 HPLC analyzer), ferritin (cobas e411 ECLIA hormone analyzer), fasting plasma glucose (FPG, Roche Hitachi P800/917 chemistry analyzer), hemoglobin (Beckman Coulter LH780), peripheral smear examination, red cell indices, and medical history were recorded. Statistical analysis was carried out by student's t-test, Chi-square test, and Pearson's coefficient of regression. Results: We found elevated HbA1c (6.8 ± 1.4%) in iron-deficient individuals as compared to controls, and elevation was more in women (7.02 ± 1.58%). On further classification on the basis of FPG levels, A1C was elevated more in group having fasting glucose levels between 100-126 mg/dl (7.33 ± 1.55%) compared to the those with normal plasma glucose levels (<100 mg/dl). No significant correlation was found between HbA1c and ferritin and hemoglobin. Conclusion: This study found a positive correlation between iron deficiency anemia and increased A1C levels, especially in the controlled diabetic women and individuals having FPG between 100-126 mg/dl. Hence, before altering the treatment regimen for diabetic patient, presence of iron deficiency anemia should be considered.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)88-92
Number of pages5
JournalIranian Biomedical Journal
Volume18
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 31-01-2014

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Iron-Deficiency Anemias
Hemoglobins
Iron
Plasmas
Glucose
Ferritins
Fasting
Erythrocyte Indices
Chi-Square Distribution
High Pressure Liquid Chromatography
Statistical methods
Hormones
Students
Cells
Population

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Clinical Biochemistry
  • Biochemistry, medical

Cite this

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title = "Influence of iron deficiency anemia on hemoglobin A1C levels in diabetic individuals with controlled plasma glucose levels",
abstract = "Introduction: Hemoglobin A1C (HbA1c) reflects patient's glycemic status over the previous 3 months. Previous studies have reported that iron deficiency may elevate A1C concentrations, independent of glycemia. This study is aimed to analyze the effect of iron deficiency anemia on HbA1c levels in diabetic population having plasma glucose levels in control. Methods: Totally, 120 diabetic, iron-deficient anemic individuals (70 females and 50 males) having controlled plasma glucose levels with same number of iron-sufficient non-anemic individuals were streamlined for the study. Their data of HbA1c (Bio-Rad D-10 HPLC analyzer), ferritin (cobas e411 ECLIA hormone analyzer), fasting plasma glucose (FPG, Roche Hitachi P800/917 chemistry analyzer), hemoglobin (Beckman Coulter LH780), peripheral smear examination, red cell indices, and medical history were recorded. Statistical analysis was carried out by student's t-test, Chi-square test, and Pearson's coefficient of regression. Results: We found elevated HbA1c (6.8 ± 1.4{\%}) in iron-deficient individuals as compared to controls, and elevation was more in women (7.02 ± 1.58{\%}). On further classification on the basis of FPG levels, A1C was elevated more in group having fasting glucose levels between 100-126 mg/dl (7.33 ± 1.55{\%}) compared to the those with normal plasma glucose levels (<100 mg/dl). No significant correlation was found between HbA1c and ferritin and hemoglobin. Conclusion: This study found a positive correlation between iron deficiency anemia and increased A1C levels, especially in the controlled diabetic women and individuals having FPG between 100-126 mg/dl. Hence, before altering the treatment regimen for diabetic patient, presence of iron deficiency anemia should be considered.",
author = "Christy, {Alap L.} and Manjrekar, {Poornima A.} and Babu, {Ruby P.} and Anupama Hegde and Rukmini, {M. S.}",
year = "2014",
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TY - JOUR

T1 - Influence of iron deficiency anemia on hemoglobin A1C levels in diabetic individuals with controlled plasma glucose levels

AU - Christy, Alap L.

AU - Manjrekar, Poornima A.

AU - Babu, Ruby P.

AU - Hegde, Anupama

AU - Rukmini, M. S.

PY - 2014/1/31

Y1 - 2014/1/31

N2 - Introduction: Hemoglobin A1C (HbA1c) reflects patient's glycemic status over the previous 3 months. Previous studies have reported that iron deficiency may elevate A1C concentrations, independent of glycemia. This study is aimed to analyze the effect of iron deficiency anemia on HbA1c levels in diabetic population having plasma glucose levels in control. Methods: Totally, 120 diabetic, iron-deficient anemic individuals (70 females and 50 males) having controlled plasma glucose levels with same number of iron-sufficient non-anemic individuals were streamlined for the study. Their data of HbA1c (Bio-Rad D-10 HPLC analyzer), ferritin (cobas e411 ECLIA hormone analyzer), fasting plasma glucose (FPG, Roche Hitachi P800/917 chemistry analyzer), hemoglobin (Beckman Coulter LH780), peripheral smear examination, red cell indices, and medical history were recorded. Statistical analysis was carried out by student's t-test, Chi-square test, and Pearson's coefficient of regression. Results: We found elevated HbA1c (6.8 ± 1.4%) in iron-deficient individuals as compared to controls, and elevation was more in women (7.02 ± 1.58%). On further classification on the basis of FPG levels, A1C was elevated more in group having fasting glucose levels between 100-126 mg/dl (7.33 ± 1.55%) compared to the those with normal plasma glucose levels (<100 mg/dl). No significant correlation was found between HbA1c and ferritin and hemoglobin. Conclusion: This study found a positive correlation between iron deficiency anemia and increased A1C levels, especially in the controlled diabetic women and individuals having FPG between 100-126 mg/dl. Hence, before altering the treatment regimen for diabetic patient, presence of iron deficiency anemia should be considered.

AB - Introduction: Hemoglobin A1C (HbA1c) reflects patient's glycemic status over the previous 3 months. Previous studies have reported that iron deficiency may elevate A1C concentrations, independent of glycemia. This study is aimed to analyze the effect of iron deficiency anemia on HbA1c levels in diabetic population having plasma glucose levels in control. Methods: Totally, 120 diabetic, iron-deficient anemic individuals (70 females and 50 males) having controlled plasma glucose levels with same number of iron-sufficient non-anemic individuals were streamlined for the study. Their data of HbA1c (Bio-Rad D-10 HPLC analyzer), ferritin (cobas e411 ECLIA hormone analyzer), fasting plasma glucose (FPG, Roche Hitachi P800/917 chemistry analyzer), hemoglobin (Beckman Coulter LH780), peripheral smear examination, red cell indices, and medical history were recorded. Statistical analysis was carried out by student's t-test, Chi-square test, and Pearson's coefficient of regression. Results: We found elevated HbA1c (6.8 ± 1.4%) in iron-deficient individuals as compared to controls, and elevation was more in women (7.02 ± 1.58%). On further classification on the basis of FPG levels, A1C was elevated more in group having fasting glucose levels between 100-126 mg/dl (7.33 ± 1.55%) compared to the those with normal plasma glucose levels (<100 mg/dl). No significant correlation was found between HbA1c and ferritin and hemoglobin. Conclusion: This study found a positive correlation between iron deficiency anemia and increased A1C levels, especially in the controlled diabetic women and individuals having FPG between 100-126 mg/dl. Hence, before altering the treatment regimen for diabetic patient, presence of iron deficiency anemia should be considered.

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JF - Iranian Biomedical Journal

SN - 1028-852X

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