Influence of the leaf extract of Mentha arvensis Linn. (Mint) on the survival of mice exposed to different doses of gamma radiation

Ganesh Chandra Jagetia, Manjeshwar Shrinath Baliga

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

55 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: The aim of the present study was to evaluate the radioprotective effect of Mentha arvensis (mint) on the survival of mice exposed to various doses of whole-body gamma radiation. Material and Methods: The radioprotective effect of various doses (0, 2.5, 5, 10, 20, 40 and 80 mg/kg body weight) of chloroform extract of mint (Mentha arvensis Linn.) was studied in mice exposed to 10 Gy gamma radiation. Results: The 10 mg/kg of mint extract was found to afford best protection as evidenced by the highest number of survivors in this group at 30 days post-irradiation, and further experiments were carried out using this dose of mint extract. The mice treated with 10 mg/kg body weight mint extract or oil were exposed to 6, 7, 8, 9 and 10 Gy of gamma radiation and observed for the induction of radiation-sickness and mortality up to 30 days post-irradiation. The mint extract pretreatment was found to reduce the severity of symptoms of radiation sickness and mortality at all exposure doses and a significant increase in the animal survival was observed when compared with the oil + irradiation group. All of the animals that were treated with 10 mg/kg mint extract and then exposed to 7 Gy irradiation were protected against the radiation-induced mortality when compared with the concurrent oil + irradiation group, in which 20% animals died by 30 days post-irradiation. The mint extract treatment protected the mice against the gastrointestinal death as well as bone marrow deaths. The DRF was found to be 1.2. The drug was non-toxic up to a dose of 1 000 mg/kg body weight, the highest drug dose that could be tested for acure toxicity. Conclusion: From our study it is clear that mint extract provides protection against the radiation-induced sickness and mortality and the optimum protective dose of 10 mg/kg is safe from the point of drug-induced toxicity.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)91-98
Number of pages8
JournalStrahlentherapie und Onkologie
Volume178
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 20-02-2002
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Mentha
Gamma Rays
Radiation Injuries
Radiation Dosage
Oils
Mortality
Body Weight
Whole-Body Irradiation
Chloroform
Drug-Related Side Effects and Adverse Reactions
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Survivors

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging
  • Oncology

Cite this

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title = "Influence of the leaf extract of Mentha arvensis Linn. (Mint) on the survival of mice exposed to different doses of gamma radiation",
abstract = "Background: The aim of the present study was to evaluate the radioprotective effect of Mentha arvensis (mint) on the survival of mice exposed to various doses of whole-body gamma radiation. Material and Methods: The radioprotective effect of various doses (0, 2.5, 5, 10, 20, 40 and 80 mg/kg body weight) of chloroform extract of mint (Mentha arvensis Linn.) was studied in mice exposed to 10 Gy gamma radiation. Results: The 10 mg/kg of mint extract was found to afford best protection as evidenced by the highest number of survivors in this group at 30 days post-irradiation, and further experiments were carried out using this dose of mint extract. The mice treated with 10 mg/kg body weight mint extract or oil were exposed to 6, 7, 8, 9 and 10 Gy of gamma radiation and observed for the induction of radiation-sickness and mortality up to 30 days post-irradiation. The mint extract pretreatment was found to reduce the severity of symptoms of radiation sickness and mortality at all exposure doses and a significant increase in the animal survival was observed when compared with the oil + irradiation group. All of the animals that were treated with 10 mg/kg mint extract and then exposed to 7 Gy irradiation were protected against the radiation-induced mortality when compared with the concurrent oil + irradiation group, in which 20{\%} animals died by 30 days post-irradiation. The mint extract treatment protected the mice against the gastrointestinal death as well as bone marrow deaths. The DRF was found to be 1.2. The drug was non-toxic up to a dose of 1 000 mg/kg body weight, the highest drug dose that could be tested for acure toxicity. Conclusion: From our study it is clear that mint extract provides protection against the radiation-induced sickness and mortality and the optimum protective dose of 10 mg/kg is safe from the point of drug-induced toxicity.",
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Influence of the leaf extract of Mentha arvensis Linn. (Mint) on the survival of mice exposed to different doses of gamma radiation. / Jagetia, Ganesh Chandra; Baliga, Manjeshwar Shrinath.

In: Strahlentherapie und Onkologie, Vol. 178, No. 2, 20.02.2002, p. 91-98.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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