Isolated inhalational injury: Clinical course and outcomes in a multidisciplinary intensive care unit

Jose Chacko, Nikahat Jahan, Gagan Brar, Ramanathan Moorthy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background and Aims: Although smoke inhalation is well known to cause acute lung injury, there are few reports in literature that study the evolution, clinical course and outcomes of isolated inhalational lung injury in a modern intensive care setting. A major fire disaster provided us the opportunity to study victims of isolated inhalational injury admitted to our Multidisciplinary Intensive Care Unit (MICU). Materials and Methods: We studied the clinical course, ICU and hospital outcomes of 13 victims of a fire disaster who required mechanical ventilation for isolated inhalational lung injury. All patients were followed up at regular intervals, and their functional status was assessed at 8 months after hospital discharge. Results: The Lung Injury Scores (LIS) worsened to reach a nadir on Day 3 of injury. There was a significant correlation between the LIS on Day 3 and duration of mechanical ventilation (r = 0.8; P = 0.003), ICU (r = 0.8; P = 0.002) and hospital (r = 0.6; P = 0.02) days. Late-onset airway complications were encountered in four patients. Three of them required long-term artificial airways - two with a tracheostomy while the third patient required surgical insertion of a "T" tube. Persistent problems with phonation occurred in two patients. At 8 months postdischarge, all patients were independent with activities of daily living; all were back to work, except for two who continued to need artificial airways. Conclusions: Inhalational lung injury progresses over the first few days and is worst after 72 h. Late-onset airway complications may manifest after several weeks and require repeated intervention.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)93-99
Number of pages7
JournalIndian Journal of Critical Care Medicine
Volume16
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 01-04-2012
Externally publishedYes

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Lung Injury
Intensive Care Units
Wounds and Injuries
Disasters
Artificial Respiration
Phonation
Return to Work
Acute Lung Injury
Tracheostomy
Critical Care
Activities of Daily Living
Smoke
Inhalation

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Critical Care and Intensive Care Medicine

Cite this

Chacko, Jose ; Jahan, Nikahat ; Brar, Gagan ; Moorthy, Ramanathan. / Isolated inhalational injury : Clinical course and outcomes in a multidisciplinary intensive care unit. In: Indian Journal of Critical Care Medicine. 2012 ; Vol. 16, No. 2. pp. 93-99.
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Isolated inhalational injury : Clinical course and outcomes in a multidisciplinary intensive care unit. / Chacko, Jose; Jahan, Nikahat; Brar, Gagan; Moorthy, Ramanathan.

In: Indian Journal of Critical Care Medicine, Vol. 16, No. 2, 01.04.2012, p. 93-99.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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