Knowledge, attitude, and practices regarding whole body donation among medical professionals in a hospital in India

Kirthinath Ballala, Avinash Shetty, Surekha Bhat Malpe

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

24 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Voluntary body donation has become an important source of cadavers for anatomical study and education. The objective of this study was to assess knowledge, attitude, and practice (KAP) regarding whole body donation among medical professionals in a medical institute in India. A cross sectional study was conducted at Kasturba Hospital, Manipal, India, among medical doctors. Data was collected from consenting individuals in the age group of 25-65 years by convenience sampling method. A semi-structured, pretested, questionnaire designed to assess KAP regarding whole body donation was provided to the study population (n = 106); 97 individuals returned the completed questionnaire. Results showed that 8% of the medical professionals were unaware of the term body donation and 85% believed that donated bodies were misused. A large proportion of the respondents did not know about the authority that oversaw body donation, or its criteria for accepting donated bodies and diseases for which bodies were screened before acceptance. Only 22% of polled physicians were willing to donate their bodies for medical education, but 68% expected the public to do the same. While only 7% had already registered their own names for body donation, 64% were not aware of any known person having registered and 72% indicated that their decision would not be influenced even if they knew of friends who had registered. These results suggest that educating medical students and professionals regarding the altruistic act of body donation is as important as educating the general public.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)142-150
Number of pages9
JournalAnatomical Sciences Education
Volume4
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 01-05-2011

Fingerprint

Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
India
Medical Education
Medical Students
Cadaver
Names
Age Groups
Cross-Sectional Studies
Physicians
Education
Population
Surveys and Questionnaires

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Anatomy
  • Histology
  • Embryology

Cite this

@article{fbc2dde32b60453e9b0ff1ee753f94ec,
title = "Knowledge, attitude, and practices regarding whole body donation among medical professionals in a hospital in India",
abstract = "Voluntary body donation has become an important source of cadavers for anatomical study and education. The objective of this study was to assess knowledge, attitude, and practice (KAP) regarding whole body donation among medical professionals in a medical institute in India. A cross sectional study was conducted at Kasturba Hospital, Manipal, India, among medical doctors. Data was collected from consenting individuals in the age group of 25-65 years by convenience sampling method. A semi-structured, pretested, questionnaire designed to assess KAP regarding whole body donation was provided to the study population (n = 106); 97 individuals returned the completed questionnaire. Results showed that 8{\%} of the medical professionals were unaware of the term body donation and 85{\%} believed that donated bodies were misused. A large proportion of the respondents did not know about the authority that oversaw body donation, or its criteria for accepting donated bodies and diseases for which bodies were screened before acceptance. Only 22{\%} of polled physicians were willing to donate their bodies for medical education, but 68{\%} expected the public to do the same. While only 7{\%} had already registered their own names for body donation, 64{\%} were not aware of any known person having registered and 72{\%} indicated that their decision would not be influenced even if they knew of friends who had registered. These results suggest that educating medical students and professionals regarding the altruistic act of body donation is as important as educating the general public.",
author = "Kirthinath Ballala and Avinash Shetty and Malpe, {Surekha Bhat}",
year = "2011",
month = "5",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1002/ase.220",
language = "English",
volume = "4",
pages = "142--150",
journal = "Anatomical Sciences Education",
issn = "1935-9772",
publisher = "John Wiley and Sons Inc.",
number = "3",

}

Knowledge, attitude, and practices regarding whole body donation among medical professionals in a hospital in India. / Ballala, Kirthinath; Shetty, Avinash; Malpe, Surekha Bhat.

In: Anatomical Sciences Education, Vol. 4, No. 3, 01.05.2011, p. 142-150.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Knowledge, attitude, and practices regarding whole body donation among medical professionals in a hospital in India

AU - Ballala, Kirthinath

AU - Shetty, Avinash

AU - Malpe, Surekha Bhat

PY - 2011/5/1

Y1 - 2011/5/1

N2 - Voluntary body donation has become an important source of cadavers for anatomical study and education. The objective of this study was to assess knowledge, attitude, and practice (KAP) regarding whole body donation among medical professionals in a medical institute in India. A cross sectional study was conducted at Kasturba Hospital, Manipal, India, among medical doctors. Data was collected from consenting individuals in the age group of 25-65 years by convenience sampling method. A semi-structured, pretested, questionnaire designed to assess KAP regarding whole body donation was provided to the study population (n = 106); 97 individuals returned the completed questionnaire. Results showed that 8% of the medical professionals were unaware of the term body donation and 85% believed that donated bodies were misused. A large proportion of the respondents did not know about the authority that oversaw body donation, or its criteria for accepting donated bodies and diseases for which bodies were screened before acceptance. Only 22% of polled physicians were willing to donate their bodies for medical education, but 68% expected the public to do the same. While only 7% had already registered their own names for body donation, 64% were not aware of any known person having registered and 72% indicated that their decision would not be influenced even if they knew of friends who had registered. These results suggest that educating medical students and professionals regarding the altruistic act of body donation is as important as educating the general public.

AB - Voluntary body donation has become an important source of cadavers for anatomical study and education. The objective of this study was to assess knowledge, attitude, and practice (KAP) regarding whole body donation among medical professionals in a medical institute in India. A cross sectional study was conducted at Kasturba Hospital, Manipal, India, among medical doctors. Data was collected from consenting individuals in the age group of 25-65 years by convenience sampling method. A semi-structured, pretested, questionnaire designed to assess KAP regarding whole body donation was provided to the study population (n = 106); 97 individuals returned the completed questionnaire. Results showed that 8% of the medical professionals were unaware of the term body donation and 85% believed that donated bodies were misused. A large proportion of the respondents did not know about the authority that oversaw body donation, or its criteria for accepting donated bodies and diseases for which bodies were screened before acceptance. Only 22% of polled physicians were willing to donate their bodies for medical education, but 68% expected the public to do the same. While only 7% had already registered their own names for body donation, 64% were not aware of any known person having registered and 72% indicated that their decision would not be influenced even if they knew of friends who had registered. These results suggest that educating medical students and professionals regarding the altruistic act of body donation is as important as educating the general public.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=79956061763&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=79956061763&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1002/ase.220

DO - 10.1002/ase.220

M3 - Article

VL - 4

SP - 142

EP - 150

JO - Anatomical Sciences Education

JF - Anatomical Sciences Education

SN - 1935-9772

IS - 3

ER -