Knowledge, awareness, perception, and willingness towards eye donation among the literate working population

Justin Egnasious, Krithica Srinivasan, Ramesh S. Ve, Babu Noushad

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Aim: To evaluate awareness, knowledge, and perception towards eye donation among the literate working population. Methods: A new questionnaire on eye donation was developed from existing literature and face validation was performed, among subject experts. Repeatability of the questionnaire was performed among 30 subjects. There was a total of 23 questions: six questions for evaluating awareness, 13 questions for evaluating knowledge, and four questions for determining the subjects’ perception. The questionnaire was distributed among subjects working in both the health science and non-health science fields. From their responses, knowledge, awareness, and perception towards eye donation in the working literate population were assessed. A pledge form was also handed out along with the questionnaire to assess the subjects’ actual willingness. Results: The questions in the awareness and knowledge domain showed good repeatability (p > 0.05). More than 50% of the parameters in the perception domain showed poor repeatability (p < 0.05). Out of 189 subjects assessed, there were 97 health science and 92 non-health science subjects with total mean age 30 ± 7 years. Good awareness was present between health science (96%) and non-health science (94%). Only 21% of the health science and 11% of the non-health science group had good knowledge about eye donation. Only 25% said ‘yes’ to willingness about eye donation. However, only 3% filled out the pledge form. No-one from the non-health science group filled out the pledge form. Health science professionals showed more willingness to donate eyes compared to the non-health science group after adjusting for qualification, age, and gender (odds ratio 2.158, p = 0.031, 95% CI (1.073, 4.341)). Study participants shared willingness to donate eyes and responded against negative perceptions such as ‘Family members object to eye donation’ (odds: 3.75, p = 0.030, 95% CI (1.14, 12.39)), ‘Dislike of separating eye from the body’ (odds:7.02, p = 0.006, 95% CI (1.73, 28.42)), and ‘Donating an organ is against my religious belief’ (odds: 8.51, p = 0.039, 95% CI (1.11, 65.09)).

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)7-18
Number of pages12
JournalAsian Journal of Ophthalmology
Volume16
Issue number1
Publication statusPublished - 01-01-2018

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Population
Health
Religion
Odds Ratio
Surveys and Questionnaires

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Ophthalmology

Cite this

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title = "Knowledge, awareness, perception, and willingness towards eye donation among the literate working population",
abstract = "Aim: To evaluate awareness, knowledge, and perception towards eye donation among the literate working population. Methods: A new questionnaire on eye donation was developed from existing literature and face validation was performed, among subject experts. Repeatability of the questionnaire was performed among 30 subjects. There was a total of 23 questions: six questions for evaluating awareness, 13 questions for evaluating knowledge, and four questions for determining the subjects’ perception. The questionnaire was distributed among subjects working in both the health science and non-health science fields. From their responses, knowledge, awareness, and perception towards eye donation in the working literate population were assessed. A pledge form was also handed out along with the questionnaire to assess the subjects’ actual willingness. Results: The questions in the awareness and knowledge domain showed good repeatability (p > 0.05). More than 50{\%} of the parameters in the perception domain showed poor repeatability (p < 0.05). Out of 189 subjects assessed, there were 97 health science and 92 non-health science subjects with total mean age 30 ± 7 years. Good awareness was present between health science (96{\%}) and non-health science (94{\%}). Only 21{\%} of the health science and 11{\%} of the non-health science group had good knowledge about eye donation. Only 25{\%} said ‘yes’ to willingness about eye donation. However, only 3{\%} filled out the pledge form. No-one from the non-health science group filled out the pledge form. Health science professionals showed more willingness to donate eyes compared to the non-health science group after adjusting for qualification, age, and gender (odds ratio 2.158, p = 0.031, 95{\%} CI (1.073, 4.341)). Study participants shared willingness to donate eyes and responded against negative perceptions such as ‘Family members object to eye donation’ (odds: 3.75, p = 0.030, 95{\%} CI (1.14, 12.39)), ‘Dislike of separating eye from the body’ (odds:7.02, p = 0.006, 95{\%} CI (1.73, 28.42)), and ‘Donating an organ is against my religious belief’ (odds: 8.51, p = 0.039, 95{\%} CI (1.11, 65.09)).",
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Knowledge, awareness, perception, and willingness towards eye donation among the literate working population. / Egnasious, Justin; Srinivasan, Krithica; Ve, Ramesh S.; Noushad, Babu.

In: Asian Journal of Ophthalmology, Vol. 16, No. 1, 01.01.2018, p. 7-18.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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