Kyasanur forest disease

Pranathi Kavi, P. Bhargavi

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Abstract

    Kyasanur forest disease (KFD) a rare viral disease found to be related to the Russian-spring summer virus but differs only because of its hemorrhagic form. KFD is known to be prevalent in the Shimoga District of Karnataka, and it was first identified in the year 1957. Victims of this disease would be those who have been exposed to deceased monkeys in forests or otherwise, have been bitten by an infected tick. Some of the initial phase symptoms include persistent headaches, fever, and muscle weakness. However, the neurological symptoms begin to appear only in the second phase of the viral attack. At this stage, viral encephalopathy, meningoencephalitis, or even meningitis could manifest and lead to vast deficits. Previous literature reviews of this disease have shown no signs of language deficits. A case of a 5-year-old child, confirmed with the KFD, with diffuse encephalopathy as well as other organ functioning deficits, showed deficits in language skills.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)56-58
    Number of pages3
    JournalIndian Journal of Otology
    Volume23
    Issue number1
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 01-01-2017

    Fingerprint

    Kyasanur Forest Disease
    Brain Diseases
    Sign Language
    Meningoencephalitis
    Muscle Weakness
    Ticks
    Virus Diseases
    Rare Diseases
    Meningitis
    Haplorhini
    Headache
    Fever
    Language
    Viruses

    All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

    • Otorhinolaryngology

    Cite this

    Kavi, Pranathi ; Bhargavi, P. / Kyasanur forest disease. In: Indian Journal of Otology. 2017 ; Vol. 23, No. 1. pp. 56-58.
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    Kavi, P & Bhargavi, P 2017, 'Kyasanur forest disease', Indian Journal of Otology, vol. 23, no. 1, pp. 56-58. https://doi.org/10.4103/0971-7749.199504

    Kyasanur forest disease. / Kavi, Pranathi; Bhargavi, P.

    In: Indian Journal of Otology, Vol. 23, No. 1, 01.01.2017, p. 56-58.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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