Lactobacillus sepsis associated with probiotic therapy

Michael H. Land, Kelly Rouster-Stevens, Charles R. Woods, Michael L. Cannon, James Cnota, Avinash K. Shetty

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

394 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Probiotic strains of lactobacilli are increasingly being used in clinical practice because of their many health benefits. Infections associated with probiotic strains of lactobacilli are extremely rare. We describe 2 patients who received probiotic lactobacilli and subsequently developed bacteremia and sepsis attributable to Lactobacillus species. Molecular DNA fingerprinting analysis showed that the Lactobacillus strain isolated from blood samples was indistinguishable from the probiotic strain ingested by the patients. This report indicates, for the first time, that invasive disease can be associated with probiotic lactobacilli. This report should not discourage the appropriate use of Lactobacillus or other probiotic agents but should serve as a reminder that these agents can cause invasive disease in certain populations.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)178-181
Number of pages4
JournalPediatrics
Volume115
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 01-01-2005
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Probiotics
Lactobacillus
Sepsis
Therapeutics
DNA Fingerprinting
Insurance Benefits
Bacteremia
Infection
Population

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Land, M. H., Rouster-Stevens, K., Woods, C. R., Cannon, M. L., Cnota, J., & Shetty, A. K. (2005). Lactobacillus sepsis associated with probiotic therapy. Pediatrics, 115(1), 178-181. https://doi.org/10.1542/peds.2004-2137
Land, Michael H. ; Rouster-Stevens, Kelly ; Woods, Charles R. ; Cannon, Michael L. ; Cnota, James ; Shetty, Avinash K. / Lactobacillus sepsis associated with probiotic therapy. In: Pediatrics. 2005 ; Vol. 115, No. 1. pp. 178-181.
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Land, MH, Rouster-Stevens, K, Woods, CR, Cannon, ML, Cnota, J & Shetty, AK 2005, 'Lactobacillus sepsis associated with probiotic therapy', Pediatrics, vol. 115, no. 1, pp. 178-181. https://doi.org/10.1542/peds.2004-2137

Lactobacillus sepsis associated with probiotic therapy. / Land, Michael H.; Rouster-Stevens, Kelly; Woods, Charles R.; Cannon, Michael L.; Cnota, James; Shetty, Avinash K.

In: Pediatrics, Vol. 115, No. 1, 01.01.2005, p. 178-181.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Land MH, Rouster-Stevens K, Woods CR, Cannon ML, Cnota J, Shetty AK. Lactobacillus sepsis associated with probiotic therapy. Pediatrics. 2005 Jan 1;115(1):178-181. https://doi.org/10.1542/peds.2004-2137