Lexical-semantic processing of action verbs and non-action nouns in Persian speakers: Behavioral evidence from the semantic similarity judgment task

Tabassom Azimi, Zahra sadat Ghoreishi, Reza Nilipour, Morteza Farazi, Akram Ahmadi, Gopee Krishnan, Pedram Aliniaye Asli

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The processing of sensory-motor aspect of word's meaning, and its difference between nouns and verbs, is the main topic of neurolinguistic research. The present study aimed to examine the lexical-semantic processing of Persian non-action nouns and action verbs. The possible effects of semantic correlates on noun/verb dissociation were evaluated without morphological confound. A total of 62 neurologically intact Persian speakers responded to a computerized semantic similarity judgment task, including 34 triplets of non-action nouns and 34 triplets of action verbs by pressing a key. Response Time (RT) and percentage error were considered as indirect measures of lexical-semantic encoding efficiency. We also assessed the latency of hand movement execution with no linguistic demand. The results showed that action verbs elicited more errors and had slower RT compared with object nouns. Mixed ANOVA revealed that the observed noun/verb distinction was not affected by demographic factors. These results provided evidence that the lexical-semantic encoding of Persian action verbs, compared to non-action nouns, requires more support from cognitive sources‏ ‏during the processing of the motor‏-‏related semantic feature. The possible accounts for the different processing of action verbs in terms of semantic view are suggested.

Original languageEnglish
JournalApplied Neuropsychology:Adult
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 2020

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Neuropsychology and Physiological Psychology
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

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