Long-term change in central corneal thickness from a glaucoma perspective

Nikhil S. Choudhari, Ronnie George, Ramesh Ve Sathyamangalam, Prema Raju, Rashima Asokan, Lokapavani Velumuri, Lingam Vijaya

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Aim: To investigate the longitudinal change in central corneal thickness (CCT) over 3 years in patients with glaucoma. Materials and Methods: The Chennai Glaucoma Follow-up Study, an offshoot of the Chennai Glaucoma Study, was designed to evaluate the progression of glaucoma. A cohort of participants in the Chennai Glaucoma Study that were suffering from glaucoma or were at a higher risk for glaucoma underwent comprehensive ophthalmic evaluation at the base hospital at 6-month intervals during the years 2004 to 2007. The CCT (average of 10 readings) was measured between 11 am and 1 pm on any given day using an ultrasonic pachymeter. Patients with a history of ocular surgery, corneal disease and usage of topical carbonic anhydrase inhibitor were excluded. No patient was a contact lens wearer. Results: One hundred and ninety-six patients (84 male, 112 female) met the inclusion criteria. We analyzed data from the right eye. The mean age of the patients was 59.97 ± 9.06 years. Fifty-nine (30.1%) of the patients were diabetic. The mean change in CCT (CCT at first patient visit - CCT at last patient visit) was 3.46 ± 7.63 μm. The mean change in CCT was 0.75 μm per year (R 2 = 0.00). Age, gender, intraocular pressure at the first patient visit and diabetic status had no significant influence on the magnitude of change in CCT. Conclusion: A carefully obtained CCT reading by a trained examiner need not be repeated for at least 3 years as long as the ocular and systemic factors known to affect the measurement of CCT are constant.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)580-584
Number of pages5
JournalIndian Journal of Ophthalmology
Volume61
Issue number10
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 01-10-2013

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Glaucoma
Reading
Corneal Pachymetry
Corneal Diseases
Carbonic Anhydrase Inhibitors
Contact Lenses
Intraocular Pressure
Ultrasonics

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Ophthalmology

Cite this

Choudhari, Nikhil S. ; George, Ronnie ; Sathyamangalam, Ramesh Ve ; Raju, Prema ; Asokan, Rashima ; Velumuri, Lokapavani ; Vijaya, Lingam. / Long-term change in central corneal thickness from a glaucoma perspective. In: Indian Journal of Ophthalmology. 2013 ; Vol. 61, No. 10. pp. 580-584.
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abstract = "Aim: To investigate the longitudinal change in central corneal thickness (CCT) over 3 years in patients with glaucoma. Materials and Methods: The Chennai Glaucoma Follow-up Study, an offshoot of the Chennai Glaucoma Study, was designed to evaluate the progression of glaucoma. A cohort of participants in the Chennai Glaucoma Study that were suffering from glaucoma or were at a higher risk for glaucoma underwent comprehensive ophthalmic evaluation at the base hospital at 6-month intervals during the years 2004 to 2007. The CCT (average of 10 readings) was measured between 11 am and 1 pm on any given day using an ultrasonic pachymeter. Patients with a history of ocular surgery, corneal disease and usage of topical carbonic anhydrase inhibitor were excluded. No patient was a contact lens wearer. Results: One hundred and ninety-six patients (84 male, 112 female) met the inclusion criteria. We analyzed data from the right eye. The mean age of the patients was 59.97 ± 9.06 years. Fifty-nine (30.1{\%}) of the patients were diabetic. The mean change in CCT (CCT at first patient visit - CCT at last patient visit) was 3.46 ± 7.63 μm. The mean change in CCT was 0.75 μm per year (R 2 = 0.00). Age, gender, intraocular pressure at the first patient visit and diabetic status had no significant influence on the magnitude of change in CCT. Conclusion: A carefully obtained CCT reading by a trained examiner need not be repeated for at least 3 years as long as the ocular and systemic factors known to affect the measurement of CCT are constant.",
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Choudhari, NS, George, R, Sathyamangalam, RV, Raju, P, Asokan, R, Velumuri, L & Vijaya, L 2013, 'Long-term change in central corneal thickness from a glaucoma perspective', Indian Journal of Ophthalmology, vol. 61, no. 10, pp. 580-584. https://doi.org/10.4103/0301-4738.119338

Long-term change in central corneal thickness from a glaucoma perspective. / Choudhari, Nikhil S.; George, Ronnie; Sathyamangalam, Ramesh Ve; Raju, Prema; Asokan, Rashima; Velumuri, Lokapavani; Vijaya, Lingam.

In: Indian Journal of Ophthalmology, Vol. 61, No. 10, 01.10.2013, p. 580-584.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Choudhari, Nikhil S.

AU - George, Ronnie

AU - Sathyamangalam, Ramesh Ve

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N2 - Aim: To investigate the longitudinal change in central corneal thickness (CCT) over 3 years in patients with glaucoma. Materials and Methods: The Chennai Glaucoma Follow-up Study, an offshoot of the Chennai Glaucoma Study, was designed to evaluate the progression of glaucoma. A cohort of participants in the Chennai Glaucoma Study that were suffering from glaucoma or were at a higher risk for glaucoma underwent comprehensive ophthalmic evaluation at the base hospital at 6-month intervals during the years 2004 to 2007. The CCT (average of 10 readings) was measured between 11 am and 1 pm on any given day using an ultrasonic pachymeter. Patients with a history of ocular surgery, corneal disease and usage of topical carbonic anhydrase inhibitor were excluded. No patient was a contact lens wearer. Results: One hundred and ninety-six patients (84 male, 112 female) met the inclusion criteria. We analyzed data from the right eye. The mean age of the patients was 59.97 ± 9.06 years. Fifty-nine (30.1%) of the patients were diabetic. The mean change in CCT (CCT at first patient visit - CCT at last patient visit) was 3.46 ± 7.63 μm. The mean change in CCT was 0.75 μm per year (R 2 = 0.00). Age, gender, intraocular pressure at the first patient visit and diabetic status had no significant influence on the magnitude of change in CCT. Conclusion: A carefully obtained CCT reading by a trained examiner need not be repeated for at least 3 years as long as the ocular and systemic factors known to affect the measurement of CCT are constant.

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