Maxillary necrosis by mucormycosis. A case report and literature review

Ajit Auluck

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

47 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The maxilla rarely undergoes necrosis due to its rich vascularity. Maxillary necrosis can occur due to bacterial infections such as osteomyelitis, viral infections such as herpes zoster or fungal infections such as mucormycosis, aspergillosis etc. Mucormycosis is an opportunistic fulminant fungal infection, which mainly infects immunocompromised patients. The infection begins in the nose and paranasal sinuses due to inhalation of fungal spores. The infection can spread to orbital and intracranial structures either by direct invasion or through the blood vessels. The fungus invades the arteries leading to thrombosis that subsequently causes necrosis of hard and soft tissues. We report a case of maxillary necrosis by mucormycosis in an uncontrolled diabetic patient to emphasize early diagnosis of this potentially fatal fungal infection. We briefly discuss different diseases which can lead to maxillary necrosis and review the current concepts in management of mucormycosis. Early diagnosis and prompt treatment can reduce the mortality and morbidity of this lethal fungal infection.

Original languageEnglish
JournalMedicina Oral, Patologia Oral y Cirugia Bucal
Volume12
Issue number5
Publication statusPublished - 01-09-2007
Externally publishedYes

    Fingerprint

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Surgery
  • Otorhinolaryngology
  • Dentistry(all)

Cite this