Metformin for olanzapine-induced weight gain: A systematic review and meta-analysis

Samir Kumar Praharaj, Amlan Kusum Jana, Nishant Goyal, Vinod Kumar Sinha

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

51 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Olanzapine is an atypical antipsychotic that is useful in schizophrenia and bipolar affective disorder, but its use is associated with troublesome weight gain and metabolic syndrome. A variety of pharmacological agents has been studied in the efforts to reverse weight gain induced by olanzapine, but current evidence is insufficient to support any particular pharmacological approach. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials of metformin for the treatment of olanzapine-induced weight gain. Systematic review of the literature revealed 12 studies that had assessed metformin for antipsychotic-induced weight gain. Of these, four studies (n= 105) met the review inclusion criteria and were included in the final analysis. Meta-analysis was performed to see the effect size of the treatment on body weight, waist circumference and body-mass index (BMI). Weighted mean difference (WMD) for body weight was 5.02 (95% CI 3.93, 6.10) kg lower with metformin as compared with placebo at 12 weeks. For waist circumference, the test for heterogeneity was significant (P= 0.00002, I2= 85.1%). Therefore, a random effects model was used to calculate WMD, which was 1.42 (95% CI 0.29, 3.13) cm lower with metformin as compared with placebo at 12 weeks. For BMI, WMD was 1.82 (95% CI 1.44, 2.19) kgm-2 lower with metformin as compared with placebo at 12 weeks. Existing data suggest that short term modest weight loss is possible with metformin in patients with olanzapine-induced weight gain.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)377-382
Number of pages6
JournalBritish Journal of Clinical Pharmacology
Volume71
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 01-03-2011

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olanzapine
Metformin
Weight Gain
Meta-Analysis
Placebos
Waist Circumference
Antipsychotic Agents
Body Mass Index
Body Weight
Pharmacology
Mood Disorders
Bipolar Disorder
Weight Loss
Schizophrenia
Randomized Controlled Trials

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pharmacology
  • Pharmacology (medical)

Cite this

Praharaj, Samir Kumar ; Jana, Amlan Kusum ; Goyal, Nishant ; Sinha, Vinod Kumar. / Metformin for olanzapine-induced weight gain : A systematic review and meta-analysis. In: British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology. 2011 ; Vol. 71, No. 3. pp. 377-382.
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Metformin for olanzapine-induced weight gain : A systematic review and meta-analysis. / Praharaj, Samir Kumar; Jana, Amlan Kusum; Goyal, Nishant; Sinha, Vinod Kumar.

In: British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology, Vol. 71, No. 3, 01.03.2011, p. 377-382.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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